FAQs

FAQs2017-07-28T09:17:37-05:00
Bridge Structures2017-10-03T15:17:18-05:00
QUESTION: (FALL2010) CSA Standard S6, Canadian Highway Bridge Design Code, requires that cross-frame connection plates be connected to the flanges of bridge girders. The bolted detail, as shown (in Figure 1), appears to be quite popular in rehabilitation work. I heard that this bolted detail qualifies for a “Category B“ fatigue detail, but it is not clear to me how simply bolting the stiffener to the bottom flange makes things better because the web weld is still present.
ANSWER: Where the stiffener also serves as a cross-frame connection plate, both distortion-induced fatigue and load-induced fatigue should be considered. The bolted detail as shown does not alter the stiffener-to-web welded fatigue detail with respect to load-induced fatigue because this welded detail remains “Category C1”. However, connecting the connection plate to the flanges (when done correctly) should improve the distortion-induced fatigue resistance substantially.
In order to avoid welded attachments in the tension flange, many older welded steel bridge girders feature cross-frame connection plates that were either cut short from, or ground to bear on, the tension flange. This outdated practice inadvertently resulted in the web taking out-of-plane stresses due to relative displacements of adjacent girders. These stress ranges, typically unaccounted for in the analyses, have been identified as the common cause of distortion-induced fatigue damage to welded bridge girders. Recent editions of CSA S6 require that cross-frames and diaphragms be connected to each flange for a minimum force of 90 kN.
Building Structures – General2017-10-03T15:20:29-05:00
QUESTION: (SPRING2012) When CSA G40.21 300W steel strip is specified as the material for light braces in a building structure, can commercial grade steel products be used instead? What if they are supplied with a test report showing yield stress values matching or exceeding 300 MPa?

ANSWER: No. The reasons include:
a) Commercial grade steel sheet and strip are not produced to meet mandatory mechanical properties, such as minimum yield point, tensile strength and elongation; and
b) Strength levels reported on mill test certificates should not be used as the basis for design. See Clause 5.1.2 of CSA Standard S16-09.

QUESTION: (SPRING2011) In accordance with the National Building Code, steel building systems shall be manufactured by companies certified to CSA A660 “Certification of Manufacturers of Steel Building Systems.” Does this requirement apply to all steel fabricating plants?

ANSWER: No, CSA A660 does not apply to all steel fabricating plants. A steel building system (SBS) features steel for the structural components plus related accessories engineered and designed as a total building system, commonly referred to as “pre-engineered buildings” for which the manufacturer is responsible for both the structural design and fabrication of the building system. Since the designer of the steel building system is also the seller, there is no independent third-party representing the interests of the public. CSA A660 ensures that the SBS manufacturer is complying with the applicable building codes and design standards, and the public is protected.
The vast majority of structural steel fabricators in Canada are only involved with fabrication of building structures that are designed by engineers employed by others. These fabricators are not required to be certified to CSA A660. They are certified to CSA W47.1 (welding). Some are also certified to CISC Quality Certification Program for Steel Structures. For information on CISC Certification Programs, visit the CISC website at http://www.cisc-icca.ca/certification

 

Connections – Bolts & Bolting2017-10-03T15:27:53-05:00
QUESTION: (FALL2015) I recently came across some fully threaded A325 bolts in the connections of a building structure. Are these bolts permitted? Do they have the same resistances versus bolts with regular thread length? How are they identified after installation? Do they offer any benefit?

ANSWER: A325 bolts threaded full length are permitted under Supplementary Requirement S1 of ASTM A325. They are restricted to bolt lengths within the length of four times the nominal diameter.

Bolt resistances: Since the tensile resistance is based on the threaded area (0.75Ab) it is not affected by the longer thread length. However, the bearing-type shear resistance must be reduced to account for threads intercepting the shear plane. When used in a slip-critical joint with a long grip, the smaller (threaded) bolt area in the entire grip affects the relationship between the clamping force and bolt elongation and may result in a reduction in clamping force when using the turn-of-nut installation method. The significance of this effect is a study in pursuit.

Identification: The bolt head is marked with the symbol “A325T” instead of “A325” as shown in Figure 1.

 
Benefits: They offer no benefit in terms of bolt resistance. However, the fabricator and erector may find their use viable for certain applications from the standpoint of ordering and inventory control, particularly for applications where thin connected steel parts, instead of the bolts, control the connection shear resistance.
 
QUESTION: (FALL2015) What is the minimum bolt length requirement for high-strength bolts; must the bolt end past the nut when installed?

ANSWER: A325 and A490 bolts, when installed, must have sufficient thread engagement to develop the tensile strength of the bolt, i.e. they must have the bolt end extending beyond or at least flush with the outer face of the nut.

QUESTION: (SUMMER2015) Are RCSC Specifications mandatory for projects in Canada?

ANSWER: The Research Council on Structural Connections (RCSC) Specification for Structural Joints Using High-Strength Bolts provides state-of-the-art criteria for design and installation of ASTM high-strength bolts and assemblies. These recommendations become mandatory if and when the local code adopts them. In Canada, structural design and inspection of bolted joints and installation of high-strength bolts should comply with CSA Standard S6 or provincial specifications for road bridge structures and S16 for building and other structures to which S16 applies. These standards adopt many recommendations in the RCSC Specification but not all and certainly not all at the same time. In addition, S6 and S16 adopt ASTM specifications for high-strength bolts and bolt assemblies, e.g. ASTM A325 and F1852, by reference. These ASTM Specifications reference other pertinent specifications for testing, etc.

QUESTION: (WINTER2014/2015) The resistances for bolts in tension and shear have increased significantly from those tabulated in the Handbook that I received in 2000. Are the modern high-strength bolts produced to a higher strength or have more recent research and testing substantiated the increase in resistance?

ANSWER: The difference in bolt resistances for the ultimate limit states you noted reflects the increase in the resistance factor for bolts. When the first limit states design standard for design of steel structures, CSA S16.1-74, was introduced in 1974 only two resistance factors were adopted, for simplicity – 0.90 for steel members and 0.67 for welds, bolts, concrete in composite beams and shear connectors. Research studies based on tests and statistic analyses suggest that the resistance factor for high strength bolts can be increased to 0.80, as documented in Guide to Design Criteria for Bolted and Riveted Joints, Second Edition (available via this link: http://boltcouncil.org/files/2ndEditionGuide.pdf.) This increase was first introduced to the Canadian Bridge Design Code when CAN/CSA S6-00 took effect; the change was adopted in S16 when S16-01 was released.

QUESTION: (SUMMER2014) Are bolted moment connections used in a canopy structure required to be slip critical? My question relates to a situation where slip critical connections are not required for deflection control. I have many years of connection design experience but seldom had to provide slip-critical connections for wind-load resisting braced bents or moment frames.

ANSWER: The key question here is whether fatigue is a consideration; will the structure be subjected to repetitive loading and stress reversal? A relatively light canopy type of structure subjected to gusty local wind load may experience stress reversal and a significant number of load cycles to warrant such assessment. The judgement rests with the engineer responsible for the design of the structure. Fatigue design is covered in Clause 26 of S16.

QUESTION: (SPRING2014) Where can I find the standard torque table for pretensioning A325 bolts?

ANSWER: The use of ‘standard torque table’ for pretensioning high strength bolts was discontinued several decades ago. When pretensioning is required, CSA Standard S16 recognizes three bolt installation methods:

a) Turn- of-nut method;

b) Using ASTM F1852 tension control bolt assemblies; and

c) Using an F959 direct tension indicator.Both S16-09 and S16-14 assign a higher slip resistance to bolts installed by the turn-of-nut method versus the other methods for a given Class of contact surface, recognizing the larger pretension typically attained using the turn-of-nut method.

QUESTION:  (FALL2013) When ASTM F1852 bolts are used in a simple bearing-type shear connection designed to receive A325 bolts of equal size, does the bolt tension in F1852 bolts due to pre-tensioning reduce the shear strength?

ANSWER: The answer is no. As recognized in CSA S16-09, the bolt in an ASTM F1852 twist-off type bolt assembly has the same ultimate shear strength as an A325 bolt of equal size. The ultimate shear strength of a high strength bolt is not affected by the presence of an initial pretension in the bolt.The Commentary to RCSC Specification for Structural Joints Using High-Strength Bolts offers this explanation:

“When required, pretension is induced in a bolt by imposing a small axial elongation during installation, as described in the Commentary to Section 8. When the joint is subsequently loaded in shear, tension or combined shear and tension, the bolts will undergo significant deformations prior to failure that have the effect of overriding the small axial elongation that was introduced during installation, thereby removing the pretension. Measurements taken in laboratory tests confirm that the pretension that would be sustained if the applied load were removed is essentially zero before the bolt fails in shear (Kulak et al., 1987; pp. 93-94). Thus, the shear and tensile strengths of a bolt are not affected by the presence of an initial pretension in the bolt.”

It should be noted that, for a given Class of faying surface (Class A, B or C), S16-09 assigns a smaller slip resistance to F1852 assemblies versus their A325 counterparts pretensioned by means of the turn-of-nut method, in recognition of the larger pretension typical in the turn-of-nut method of installation.

QUESTION: (SUMMER2013) What are the most common high-strength bolt products used in building construction?

ANSWER: Three-quarter-inch A325 bolts are still very common. Some fabricators/erectors prefer seven-eighth-inch A325 bolts, especially for large projects. A490 bolts are used increasingly in building construction. Typically, they are selected for connections resisting very large forces while A325 bolts may be used elsewhere in the structure. In such applications, care must be taken to prevent A325 bolts from being inadvertently installed in holes designed to receive A490 bolts. It is prudent to segregate them by size, typically, a quarter of an inch difference in diameter.Practical combinations include:

a) 1˝ A490 bolts for heavy connections and ¾˝ A325 bolts elsewhere; and
b) 1⅛˝ A490 bolts for heavy connections and ⅞˝ A325 bolts elsewhere.

Where pre-tensioned installation is required, twist-off type tension-control bolts (assemblies) have emerged to be viable options. ASTM F1852 and ASTM F2280 bolts (twist-off type) share the ultimate-limit-state resistances with A325 bolts and A490 bolts respectively. However, CSA S16-09 specifies smaller values for 5 per cent slip coefficients, c1, for these twist-off type bolt assemblies versus those of high strength bolts pre-tensioned to meet the turn-of-nut method of installation. For further discussion on ASTM F1852 and ASTM F2280, visit Q & A Column in Advantage Steel No. 38. A490 and F2280 products shall not be galvanized.

Use of metric bolts is still rare because they are unavailable unless a special order for a very large quantity is placed with advance notice.

QUESTION: (FALL2012) When designing bolted connections, are seismic loads considered to be static or cyclic?

ANSWER: The Seismic Corner article entitled “Bolted Connections for Seismic Applications” in CISC publication, Advantage Steel No. 31 (Summer 2008), outlined the requirements for bolted connections for seismic applications in accordance with S16-01.The article is available at: https://cisc-icca.ca/ciscwp/product/advantage-steel-no-31/

In NBC 2010 and S16-09, the building height restriction for Conventional Construction where the specified short-period spectral acceleration, IEFaSa(0.2), exceeds 0.35 has been increased. The above mentioned requirements for bolted connections also apply to these taller structures of Conventional Construction.

QUESTION:  (SPRING2012) When wide-flange purlins are also subjected to significant axial tension, which is transmitted by connecting the bottom flange to the supports with two transverse lines of high strength bolts, how do I account for shear lag? Specifically, should the effective net area, Ane, be taken as 0.75An, as provided in Clause 12.3.3.2 (c) (ii) of S16-09?

ANSWER: The approach as you described is unconservative. In this situation, the effect of shear lag is more severe than the case for angles connected by one leg with two transverse lines of fasteners. Hence Ane < 0.60An. On the other hand, the lower bound for Ane may be taken as Anf, where Anf is the net area of the connected flange alone. Therefore, Ane should lie somewhere between Anf and 0.60An.

QUESTION:  (FALL2010) I have noticed that twist-off bolts are gaining popularity. Are they accepted as high-strength bolts for structural applications? If they are, what are the shear and tensile resistances?

ANSWER:  ASTM F1852, twist-off type tension control structural bolt/nut/washer assemblies, are used increasingly in pre-tensioned connections. These bolts feature a splined end which, when properly installed with a special wrench, should shear off when the target pretension is reached (See Figure 2). ASTM F1852 and F2280 bolts have mechanical and chemical properties equivalent to A325 and A490 high-strength bolts, respectively. Specific design requirements can be found in CSA Standard S16-09 Clauses 22.2.5 and 23.8.4 and in Table 3.The tabulated values for ultimate shear resistance in bearing-type connections and tensile resistances of A325 and A490 bolts in Part 3 of the CISC Handbook of Steel Construction may be used for F1852 and F2280 bolts, respectively, whereas smaller values for the 5% slip coefficients, c1, are specified in Table 3 of S16-09 for use of twist-off bolts in slip-critical connections.

Because surface friction is an important factor during installation, these bolt assemblies include hardened washers. Also, the use of tension-control bolts calls for prior testing and particular attention to their handling and storage so as to avoid lubricant deterioration over time.

                  – Column Bases & Anchor Rods2017-10-03T15:23:57-05:00
QUESTION: (SUMMER2014) I am involved with evaluation of an existing building structure for compliance with the current code. The structure is in a sound condition. It satisfies the building code and CSA S16-09 for the intended occupancy except that the column bases have 2 anchor rods instead of 4. In one area, a row of small wide-flange columns sit on a concrete wall. The x-axis of these columns, their anchor rods and the centre line of the wall all lie in the same plane. It is impossible to install 4 anchor rods in the normal configuration to this relatively thin wall. However, I can provide 4 collinear rods per column by adding 2 more. Is this collinear pattern acceptable?

ANSWER: I see two parts in your question:

a) Is collinear distribution of 4 anchor rods in compliance with Clause 25.2 of S16? The requirement for a minimum of 4 anchor rods aims to ensure erection safety. The rods should be positioned to provide an adequate lever arm against overturning in more than one direction. Clause 25.2 of S16-14 specifies 4 non-collinear rods per column, unless special precautions are taken.

b) Does Clause 25.2 apply to a structure that has been completed and in service? No, it is an erection safety requirement.

QUESTION: (FALL2013) When anchor bolts are used to transfer lateral shear in a column base, what is the maximum hole size permitted? I have come across a guide in the literature recommending a maximum hole diameter of 1/16” larger than the anchor bolt diameter but the contractors demand much larger holes.

ANSWER: Typically, a shear lug(s) is used to transfer large shear forces between a column base and the footing. Anchor rods are also used, generally to transfer smaller shear. Use of standard hole size for bolts, or 1/16” hole clearance, is not a practical solution as larger holes are necessary in order to accommodate anchor rod installation tolerances, etc. In that case, appropriately designed washers with standard holes are field-welded to the base plate in the erected position to transfer the shear forces. It has been reported in research studies that these anchor rods are subjected to bending as well as shear and any tension where present.

QUESTION: (SUMMER2013) Is there a standard for anchor bolts?

ANSWER: Yes, ASTM F1554 covers three grades of anchor bolts: Grade 36 (248 MPa), Grade 55 (380 MPa) and Grade 105 (724 MPa).The vast majority of anchor bolts (or anchor rods as defined in CSA S16-09) are used to position, level and secure base plates for concentrically loaded gravity columns. Fabricators have traditionally supplied these anchor rods manufactured from round bar stocks produced to ASTM A36 (or CSA G40.21 300W). Since the introduction of ASTM F1554, Grade 36 products fill this role.Grades 55 and 105 are produced to meet higher specified strengths. In addition, when specified in the purchased order as a ‘supplementary requirement,’ they are supplied to meet specific Charpy notch-toughness with test values.

                  – General2017-10-03T15:28:52-05:00
QUESTION: (2015) For a knife-edge beam shear connection with double-angle welded to the support (Figure 2), can the top edge of the angles also be welded in order to increase the weld capacity?
ANSWER: Beam shear connections must exhibit sufficient end rotation to allow the attainment of bending capacity of the simply supported beam, etc. Welding the top edge of the angles to the support inhibits end rotation and should therefore be avoided.
QUESTION: (FALL2015) I recently came across some fully threaded A325 bolts in the connections of a building structure. Are these bolts permitted? Do they have the same resistances versus bolts with regular thread length? How are they identified after installation? Do they offer any benefit?
ANSWER: A325 bolts threaded full length are permitted under Supplementary Requirement S1 of ASTM A325. They are restricted to bolt lengths within the length of four times the nominal diameter.
 
Bolt resistances: Since the tensile resistance is based on the threaded area (0.75Ab) it is not affected by the longer thread length. However, the bearing-type shear resistance must be reduced to account for threads intercepting the shear plane. When used in a slip-critical joint with a long grip, the smaller (threaded) bolt area in the entire grip affects the relationship between the clamping force and bolt elongation and may result in a reduction in clamping force when using the turn-of-nut installation method. The significance of this effect is a study in pursuit.
 
Identification: The bolt head is marked with the symbol “A325T” instead of “A325” as shown in Figure 1.
 
Benefits: They offer no benefit in terms of bolt resistance. However, the fabricator and erector may find their use viable for certain applications from the standpoint of ordering and inventory control, particularly for applications where thin connected steel parts, instead of the bolts, control the connection shear resistance.
QUESTION: (WINTER2014/2015) How is the shear resistance for gross section of gusset plates determined – should I use Clause 13.4.3 of S16-09 on webs of flexural members not having two flanges or Clause 13.11 on block shear? They give very different results.

ANSWER: Neither. Clause 21.12, “Connected elements under combined tension and shear stresses”, a new clause introduced in CSA S16-14, covers this.

QUESTION: (SUMMER2014) Are bolted moment connections used in a canopy structure required to be slip critical? My question relates to a situation where slip critical connections are not required for deflection control. I have many years of connection design experience but seldom had to provide slip-critical connections for wind-load resisting braced bents or moment frames.

ANSWER: The key question here is whether fatigue is a consideration; will the structure be subjected to repetitive loading and stress reversal? A relatively light canopy type of structure subjected to gusty local wind load may experience stress reversal and a significant number of load cycles to warrant such assessment. The judgement rests with the engineer responsible for the design of the structure. Fatigue design is covered in Clause 26 of S16.

QUESTION: I find the design requirements for pin-connected tension members as stipulated in CSA S16-09 very difficult to satisfy. They appear to mandate the use of eyebars. Have I missed something?

ANSWER: The requirements in CSA S16-09 aim to ensure a gross-section yielding ultimate limit state and are therefore quite restrictive. New requirements have been introduced in CSA S16-14. This new provision improves design versatility considerably.

QUESTION: (SPRING2014) When only one leg of an angle tension member is attached to its end supports, with longitudinal fillet welds, how do I determine if shear lag is important and how is it accounted for?

ANSWER: The effect due to shear lag in a tension member is usually accounted for by means of an effective area method. For weld-connected members, Clause 12.3.3.3 of CSA S16-09 applies to members of various cross sections in general. The cross-section area of the angle is divided into two components, i.e., the attached leg and the outstanding leg. Figure 1(a) shows an angle connected by a pair of longitudinal welds of length, L. For the attached leg, shear lag is a factor when L ≤ 2w2. In accordance with Clause 12.3.3.3 (b)(ii) and (iii), its effective net area, An2, as shown in Figure 1(b), is determined based on the weld configuration and, for short welds, also the leg thickness. The effective net area of the outstanding leg, An3, is calculated according to Clause 12.3.3.3(c). Its shear lag effect is given as a function of the ratio of the eccentricity of the weld with respect to the centroid of the outstanding leg, x, to the weld length, L. Then the tensile resistance of the member is calculated in accordance with Clause 13.2(a)(iii) using the total effective net area of the angle section, Ane = An2 + An3.

Further information may be found in the CISC Commentary on CSA S16-09 in Part 2 of the Handbook of Steel Construction.

QUESTION: (SPRING2013) Clause 13.11 of S16-09 appears to have omitted the check for shear rupture of net section. What has happened to the shear rupture failure mode and where is the provision for pure shear rupture?

ANSWER: The equation provided in Clause 13.11 of S16-09, as shown below, consists of both the tension and shear contributions to the block shear resistance of a bolted joint.

The first term accounts for the resistance against tension whereas the second term represents the shear component. An example is shown in Figure 2a. The ultimate resistance of block shear is attained when the net section(s) subjected to tension reaches its fracture capacity. Typically, the deformation associated with this tensile capacity is too small to mobilize complete shear rupture at the same time. As recommended by Driver et al, the shear component is based on 0.6 times the mean value of Fy and Fu in this calculation. It should be noted that the gross area in shear, Agv(taken as the area of the plane(s) tangential to the bolt holes), is used in this calculation.Pure shear rupture, as shown for the example in Figure 2b, should also be considered. The second term of the equation above covers it. In the absence of the above-mentioned deformation incompatibility, larger shear resistance can be attained for pure shear rupture. However, Clause 13.11 provides a simple solution.

Figure 2a: Block Shear Figure                                              2b: Shear Rupture
QUESTION: (SPRING2013) How is the strength reduction factor for multi-orientation fillet welds, Mw, applied? Please show an example.

ANSWER: In the weld configuration shown in Figure 1, 8-millimetre fillet welds are used, Xu = 490 MPa and the plate is G40.21 350W steel. Note that the farside plate is thicker.

In accordance with CSA S16-09 Clause 13.13.2.2:

Vr = 0.67 ɸw Aw Xu (1.00 + 0.50 sin1.5 θ) Mw

where:θ = angle of axis of weld segment with respect to the line of action of the applied force
Mw = strength reduction factor for multi-orientation fillet welds

a) Weld segment at θ = 60o:

Orientation of the weld segment under consideration: θ1 = 60o
Orientation of the weld segment in the joint that is nearest to 90o: θ2 = θ1 = 60o

 
b) Longitudinal weld segments (θ= 0o):
Orientation of the weld segment under consideration: θ1 = 0o
Orientation of the weld segment in the joint that is nearest to 90o: θ2 = 60o
 
c) Weld group resistance:
Vr = 2 x 0.67 x 0.67 x 8 x 100 x 0.707 x 0.490 (1.00 + 0.50 sin1.5 0o) 0.895
+ 0.67 x 0.67 x 8 x 120 x 0.707 x 0.490 (1.00 + 0.50 sin1.5 60o) 1.00
= 2 x 111 + 209 = 431 kNFor matching electrodes, the base metal resistance need not be checked
   Figure 1: Strength Reduction for Multi-Orientation Fillet Welds
QUESTION: (FALL2012) When designing bolted connections, are seismic loads considered to be static or cyclic?

ANSWER: The Seismic Corner article entitled “Bolted Connections for Seismic Applications” in CISC publication, Advantage Steel No. 31 (Summer 2008), outlined the requirements for bolted connections for seismic applications in accordance with S16-01. The article is available at: https://cisc-icca.ca/ciscwp/product/advantage-steel-no-31/

In NBC 2010 and S16-09, the building height restriction for Conventional Construction where the specified short-period spectral acceleration, IEFaSa(0.2), exceeds 0.35 has been increased. The above mentioned requirements for bolted connections also apply to these taller structures of Conventional Construction.

QUESTION: (FALL2012) When designing fillet welds in shear, is it necessary to check the base metal resistance at the fusion face?

ANSWER: In accordance with S16-01, the shear resistance of fillet welds is taken as the lesser of: (a) the weld metal resistance given as a function of the ultimate strength of the electrode, Xu , and the effective throat area, Aw and (b) the base metal resistance given as a function of its tensile strength, Fu , and the fusion face area, Am. Unless over-matched electrodes are used the base metal resistance does not govern the design of longitudinally loaded joints. However, when the weld orientation approaches the transversely loaded case the base metal resistance governs due to the significantly larger weld metal resistance.In S16-09, it is no longer necessary to check the base metal strength at the fusion face when matching electrodes are used (Clause 13.13.2.2). Research studies conducted at the University of Alberta have demonstrated that the base metal resistance determined using the virgin strength of the base metal does not represent the shear resistance. The researchers pointed to the fact that the properties of the base metal at the fusion face are influenced by intermixing of the weld and base metals. Unless over-matched electrodes are used, base metal resistance at the fusion face need not be checked, regardless of weld orientation.For a list of matching electrodes for CSA G40.21 steels, see Table 4 in S16-09.

QUESTION: (SPRING2012) When wide-flange purlins are also subjected to significant axial tension, which is transmitted by connecting the bottom flange to the supports with two transverse lines of high strength bolts, how do I account for shear lag? Specifically, should the effective net area, Ane, be taken as 0.75An, as provided in Clause 12.3.3.2 (c) (ii) of S16-09?

ANSWER: The approach as you described is unconservative. In this situation, the effect of shear lag is more severe than the case for angles connected by one leg with two transverse lines of fasteners. Hence Ane < 0.60An. On the other hand, the lower bound for Ane may be taken as Anf, where Anf is the net area of the connected flange alone. Therefore, Ane should lie somewhere between Anf and 0.60An.

QUESTION: (SPRING2011) Is knife edge angle connection the right choice for axial tension or combined shear and axial tension?

ANSWER: Knife edge angle connection, commonly known as knife connection, is a very common type of beam shear connection. It features a pair of angles that are typically welded to the column in the shop and bolted to the beam web in the field (Figure 1). While knife connection serves as a popular beam shear connection, its use is not recommended where significant axial tensile forces are to be transmitted, such as end connections for braced frame members and collectors that are subjected to significant axial tensile forces. Research studies, reported in the reference below, have demonstrated that knife connection exhibits limited axial tensile resistance. In the reference below, the test results of several other common beam shear connections subjected to combined shear and axial forces were also reported.

Reference: Guravich, S. J. and Dawe, J. L. 2006. Simple beam connections in combined shear and tension. Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering. 33(4): 357-372.

Figure 1: Knife Edge Connection
                  – Welds & Welding2017-10-03T15:24:45-05:00
QUESTION: (2015) Clause 13.13.2.2 of S16-14 waives the base metal capacity requirement for fillet welds except where over-matched electrodes are used. This suggests that the rated strength of the over-matched electrode should be used to calculate the weld resistance but W59-13 requires that matching electrode strength to be used in this situation. What should I do?

ANSWER: Until these standards reconcile, they can be satisfied if the matching electrode strength (smaller) is used in this situation.

QUESTION: (SPRING2013) How is the strength reduction factor for multi-orientation fillet welds, Mw, applied? Please show an example.

ANSWER: In the weld configuration shown in Figure 1, 8-millimetre fillet welds are used, Xu = 490 MPa and the plate is G40.21 350W steel. Note that the farside plate is thicker.

In accordance with CSA S16-09 Clause 13.13.2.2:

Vr = 0.67 ɸw Aw Xu (1.00 + 0.50 sin1.5 θ) Mw

where:θ = angle of axis of weld segment with respect to the line of action of the applied force
Mw = strength reduction factor for multi-orientation fillet welds

a) Weld segment at θ = 60o:

Orientation of the weld segment under consideration: θ1 = 60o
Orientation of the weld segment in the joint that is nearest to 90o: θ2 = θ1 = 60o

 
b) Longitudinal weld segments (θ= 0o):
Orientation of the weld segment under consideration: θ1 = 0o
Orientation of the weld segment in the joint that is nearest to 90o: θ2 = 60o
 
c) Weld group resistance:
Vr = 2 x 0.67 x 0.67 x 8 x 100 x 0.707 x 0.490 (1.00 + 0.50 sin1.5 0o) 0.895
+ 0.67 x 0.67 x 8 x 120 x 0.707 x 0.490 (1.00 + 0.50 sin1.5 60o) 1.00
= 2 x 111 + 209 = 431 kNFor matching electrodes, the base metal resistance need not be checked
Figure 1: Strength Reduction for Multi-Orientation Fillet Welds
QUESTION: (FALL2012) When designing fillet welds in shear, is it necessary to check the base metal resistance at the fusion face?

ANSWER:  In accordance with S16-01, the shear resistance of fillet welds is taken as the lesser of: (a) the weld metal resistance given as a function of the ultimate strength of the electrode, Xu , and the effective throat area, Aw and (b) the base metal resistance given as a function of its tensile strength, Fu , and the fusion face area, Am. Unless over-matched electrodes are used the base metal resistance does not govern the design of longitudinally loaded joints. However, when the weld orientation approaches the transversely loaded case the base metal resistance governs due to the significantly larger weld metal resistance.
In S16-09, it is no longer necessary to check the base metal strength at the fusion face when matching electrodes are used (Clause 13.13.2.2). Research studies conducted at the University of Alberta have demonstrated that the base metal resistance determined using the virgin strength of the base metal does not represent the shear resistance. The researchers pointed to the fact that the properties of the base metal at the fusion face are influenced by intermixing of the weld and base metals. Unless over-matched electrodes are used, base metal resistance at the fusion face need not be checked, regardless of weld orientation.For a list of matching electrodes for CSA G40.21 steels, see Table 4 in S16-09.

Fabrication & Erection2017-10-03T16:34:18-05:00
QUESTION: (SUMMER2014) I am involved with evaluation of an existing building structure for compliance with the current code. The structure is in a sound condition. It satisfies the building code and CSA S16-09 for the intended occupancy except that the column bases have 2 anchor rods instead of 4. In one area, a row of small wide-flange columns sit on a concrete wall. The x-axis of these columns, their anchor rods and the centre line of the wall all lie in the same plane. It is impossible to install 4 anchor rods in the normal configuration to this relatively thin wall. However, I can provide 4 collinear rods per column by adding 2 more. Is this collinear pattern acceptable?

ANSWER: I see two parts in your question:

a) Is collinear distribution of 4 anchor rods in compliance with Clause 25.2 of S16? The requirement for a minimum of 4 anchor rods aims to ensure erection safety. The rods should be positioned to provide an adequate lever arm against overturning in more than one direction. Clause 25.2 of S16-14 specifies 4 non-collinear rods per column, unless special precautions are taken.

b) Does Clause 25.2 apply to a structure that has been completed and in service? No, it is an erection safety requirement.

General – Brittle Fracture2017-10-03T16:39:37-05:00
QUESTION: (FALL2015) I am involved with the design of an unenclosed industrial structure for which neither the building code nor the bridge code applies. Should I specify notch-tough steel? Are notch-tough W-shapes available? How do I determine the appropriate level of notch-toughness?

ANSWER: Brittle fracture is a complex subject. In order to limit the probability of its occurrence to an acceptable level, one should account for the consequence of failure together with many influential factors as described in Annex L of CSA S16-14. Notch toughness of steel is only one of these factors. Often, fracture control for structures other than buildings and bridges involves identifying the safe options then choosing the most viable solution. Hence the engineer(s) who is responsible for the design, construction specifications and supervision, QA, QC, recommendation for future inspections, etc. is in the best position to make this decision.

With respect to steel grades and their availability, this is the current situation. Although common structural steels, such as CSA G40.21 Types W and A steels generally possess notch toughness that is superior to many steel products used for non-structural applications, they are not produced to meet specific impact testing requirements. Types WT and AT steels are. Purchasers of Types WT and AT steels must also specify the required notch-toughness category that establishes the Charpy V-notch test temperature and energy level. Similarly, purchasers of ASTM steel grades, such as A992, must specify the appropriate test temperature and energy level if they so desire. To our knowledge, a North American mill produces W-sections up to about 440 kg/m to notch-toughness requirements comparable to CSA 350WT Cat. 3. It should be noted that Charpy V-notch test requirements add cost and lead time. Therefore, they should not be specified indiscriminately.
            – Coatings & Corrosion Protection2017-10-03T15:32:54-05:00
QUESTION: (FALL2010) CISC/CPMA Standard 1-73a versus CISC/CPMA Standard 2-75: What do they have in common and what are the major differences?
ANSWER: These standards provide essentially the same laboratory requirements. The provision for surface preparation reflects the key difference. In addition to removal of grease and oil in accordance with SSPC Standard SP1, CISC/CPMA 2-75 requires steel cleaning in accordance with SSPC SP7, Brush-Off Blast Cleaning. Where CISC/CPMA 2-75 serves as a primer, it should be compatible with the top coat. CISC/CPMA 1-73a is a standard for one-coat paint, not a standard for primer.
            – Codes & Standards2017-10-03T16:38:09-05:00
QUESTION: (SUMMER2016) In National Building Code of Canada 2015, the period dependant Site Coefficient F(T), used for determination of seismic Design Spectral Accelerations, has replaced Site Coefficients Fa and Fv. CSA Standard S16-14, however, continues to reference Site Coefficients, Fa and Fv. Is S16-14 out of step with NBC 2015?

ANSWER: CSA S16-14 is compatible with NBC 2015. In S16-14, coefficients Fa and Fv, appear in two expressions: the short-period specified spectral acceleration ratio, IEFaSa(0.2), and the one-second specified spectral acceleration ratio, IEFvSa(1.0). Certain values of these quantities serve as triggers for more stringent requirements whereas other values set the conditions for relaxation. Although F(T) has replaced Fa and Fv for the purpose of determination of Design Spectral Accelerations in NBC 2015 the Code retains the expressions IEFaSa(0.2) and IEFvSa(1.0) as triggers. As defined in Sentence 4.1.8.4. (7) of NBC 2015, Fa = F(0.2) and Fv = F(1.0). Ideally, F(0.2) and F(1.0) should also replace Fa and Fv respectively in these trigger expressions. This was not possible in the 2015 code cycle for the following reason: In order to be considered for adoption by NBC 2015, CSA material design standards, S16, A23.3 etc., must be published in 2014. However, changes proposed for NBC, including the period dependant Site Coefficient F(T), could not be finalized in time to meet the publication schedule for the CSA standards.

QUESTION: (SUMMER2013) Is there a standard for anchor bolts?

ANSWER: Yes, ASTM F1554 covers three grades of anchor bolts: Grade 36 (248 MPa), Grade 55 (380 MPa) and Grade 105 (724 MPa).

The vast majority of anchor bolts (or anchor rods as defined in CSA S16-09) are used to position, level and secure base plates for concentrically loaded gravity columns. Fabricators have traditionally supplied these anchor rods manufactured from round bar stocks produced to ASTM A36 (or CSA G40.21 300W). Since the introduction of ASTM F1554, Grade 36 products fill this role.

Grades 55 and 105 are produced to meet higher specified strengths. In addition, when specified in the purchased order as a ‘supplementary requirement,’ they are supplied to meet specific Charpy notch-toughness with test values.

QUESTION: (SUMMER2013) What are the most common high-strength bolt products used in building construction?

ANSWER: Three-quarter-inch A325 bolts are still very common. Some fabricators/erectors prefer seven-eighth-inch A325 bolts, especially for large projects. A490 bolts are used increasingly in building construction. Typically, they are selected for connections resisting very large forces while A325 bolts may be used elsewhere in the structure. In such applications, care must be taken to prevent A325 bolts from being inadvertently installed in holes designed to receive A490 bolts. It is prudent to segregate them by size, typically, a quarter of an inch difference in diameter.

Practical combinations include:
a) 1˝ A490 bolts for heavy connections and ¾˝ A325 bolts elsewhere; and
b) 1⅛˝ A490 bolts for heavy connections and ⅞˝ A325 bolts elsewhere. Where pre-tensioned installation is required, twist-off type tension-control bolts (assemblies) have emerged to be viable options. ASTM F1852 and ASTM F2280 bolts (twist-off type) share the ultimate-limit-state resistances with A325 bolts and A490 bolts respectively. However, CSA S16-09 specifies smaller values for 5 per cent slip coefficients, c1, for these twist-off type bolt assemblies versus those of high strength bolts pre-tensioned to meet the turn-of-nut method of installation. For further discussion on ASTM F1852 and ASTM F2280, visit Q & A Column in Advantage Steel No. 38.

A490 and F2280 products shall not be galvanized. Use of metric bolts is still rare because they are unavailable unless a special order for a very large quantity is placed with advance notice.

QUESTION: (FALL2010) CISC/CPMA Standard 1-73a versus CISC/CPMA Standard 2-75: What do they have in common and what are the major differences?

ANSWER: These standards provide essentially the same laboratory requirements. The provision for surface preparation reflects the key difference. In addition to removal of grease and oil in accordance with SSPC Standard SP1, CISC/CPMA 2-75 requires steel cleaning in accordance with SSPC SP7, Brush-Off Blast Cleaning. Where CISC/CPMA 2-75 serves as a primer, it should be compatible with the top coat. CISC/CPMA 1-73a is a standard for one-coat paint, not a standard for primer.

            – Composite Structures2017-10-03T15:33:51-05:00
QUESTION: (SPRING2011) Should I aim for full composite action for composite beams in building structures? Otherwise, where do I begin?

ANSWER: Due to the substantial increase in bending resistance gained from composite action, partial composite capacity for beams usually suffices. Factors other than the ultimate limit states of the composite beam often dictate the steel beam size and the percentage of composite shear connection:

  1. In order to benefit from one of the advantages of steel construction, beams are unshored. In that case, construction loading conditions may govern;
  2.  Since the deck flutes typically run perpendicular to the beam, as shown in Figure 2, (and wide-rib profile deck should be used for optimal stud shear capacity) full composite design often results in placing multiple studs per flute resulting in inefficient use of shear studs due to overlap of concrete shear cones; and
  3.  Live load deflection or floor vibration control may govern the design.

In accordance with S16-09, 40% or larger composite shear connection must be provided for composite resistance. Due to the above-mentioned factors, most composite beams are designed for 40% to 60% shear connection. However, composite girders are usually connected for higher composite capacity because the deck flutes run parallel to the girder and, during construction, the girder is often laterally braced by the beams framing into it (Figure 3). Where composite action is only required for stiffness measures, S16 permits 25% shear connection as the minimum.

Figure 2: Deck Perpendicular to Beam

 

Figure 3: Deck Parallel to Girder

 

            – Design In General2017-10-03T15:34:27-05:00
QUESTION: (SUMMER2015) As stated in the Commentary to S16-09, the slenderness expressions provided in Clause 13.3.3 for ‘Single-Angle Members in Compression’ are not intended for use in the design of braces in braced frames. I want to use equal-leg compression braces in a braced frame. How are these single-angle braces designed?

ANSWER: When single-angle braces are used, they typically serve as tension-only braces due to their limited compression resistance. If they must resist significant compression with only one leg connected, they must be designed as eccentrically loaded columns. In this case, Clause 13.3.2 covers flexural and flexural-torsional buckling resistances and Clause 13.8.3 addresses combined axial compression and bending.

QUESTION: (FALL2013) When checking flexural buckling of a channel section under axial load, what radius of gyration should be used to calculate Fex and Fey?

Answer: In S16-09 Clause 13.3.2, the elastic buckling stresses are given by:

For singly-symmetric sections such as channels, the same clause specifies that the y-axis is taken as the axis of symmetry. But when using the tables of properties and dimensions for channels in Part 6 of the Handbook of Steel Construction, the x-axis is defined as the axis of symmetry. Therefore, Fex should be calculated using the radius of gyration ry as given in the Handbook tables, and likewise Fey should be calculated using rx.

QUESTION: (SPRING2012) There was once a traditional steel design provision that permitted moment resisting frames to be proportioned for lateral loads independent of gravity loads. Is this empirical method recognized by S16 Standard today?

ANSWER: No. Since the introduction of CSA Standard S16-01, all concurrent loads as specified in S16 and NBC load combinations must be considered to act simultaneously (except when a variable load counteracts the effect of the principal load then the variable load should be excluded in that load combination).

QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2011) Conformément au Code national du bâtiment, les systèmes de bâtiment en acier devront être fabriqués par des entreprises possédant la certification CSA A660 « Certification des fabricants de systèmes de bâtiment en acier ». Cette exigence s’applique-t-elle à tous les fabricants d’acier?ng plants?

RÉPONSE: Non, la norme CSA A660 ne s’applique pas à tous les fabricants d’acier. Un système de bâtiment d’acier comporte de l’acier pour les éléments de charpente ainsi que des accessoires conçus et fabriqués pour produire un système de bâtiment total, qu’on appelle souvent « bâtiment métallique préfabriqué » et pour lequel le fabricant est responsable aussi bien de la conception structurale que de la fabrication du système de bâtiment. Puisque le concepteur du système de bâtiment en acier est également le vendeur, il n’y a pas de tierce partie indépendante représentant les intérêts du public. La norme CSA A660 vise à s’assurer que le fabricant de systèmes de bâtiment en acier se conforme au code du bâtiment et aux normes de conception applicables, et que le public est protégé. La grande majorité des fabricants d’acier de charpente canadiens fabriquent des structures de bâtiments qui sont conçues par des ingénieurs employés par d’autres. Ces fabricants ne sont pas tenus d’obtenir la certification CSA A660. En revanche, ils sont certifiés CSA W47.1 « Certification des compagnies de soudage par fusion de l’acier ». Certains possèdent aussi la Certification qualité de l’ICCA pour la fabrication de l’acier.

Pour plus d’information, visitez :http://www.cisc-icca.ca/certification.

                                        – Bending2017-10-11T14:32:34-05:00
QUESTION: (SUMMER2016) I am proportioning a mono-symmetric I-girder whose web-slenderness, h/w, marginally satisfies the Class 3 limit for W-shapes in pure bending in accordance with Table 2 of S16-09. Does this limit apply to mono-symmetric sections?

ANSWER: No, the limits for I-sections are provided in Table 2 of S16-09 for sections with equal flanges. CSA Standard S6, Canadian Highway Bridge Design Code, in Clause 10.10.3.1, addresses Class 3 web-limits for mono-symmetric I-sections. In this clause, the value of h is replaced by 2dc, where dc is the distance from the neutral axis to the compressive extreme fibre (see Figure).

QUESTION: (2014) I am calculating the laterally unsupported bending resistance of a singly symmetric I-section having flanges of unequal thickness. What should be the value of t in the expressions for βx and Cw provided in Sub-clause 13.6 (e) of S16-09?

ANSWER: In both expressions, the value for ʽd-tʼ may be taken as the centroidal distance between the flanges. Cw may also be calculated using the formula given under Built-up Sections in Part 6 of CISC Handbook of Steel Construction.

QUESTION: (FALL2012) How do I determine the elastic bending resistance of a cantilever plate subject to lateral-torsional buckling?

ANSWER: For a fix-ended plate subject to bending about its strong axis but laterally unbraced, the Guide to Stability Design Criteria for Metal Structures, 6th Edition (R.D. Ziemian, John Wiley & Sons, 2010) gives expressions for the elastic buckling moment (Mu), depending on the height of load application. For example, when subjected to a point load at its tip (see Figure):

a) For top surface loading:

b) For shear centre loading:

where E and G are the elastic and shear modulii respectively, Iy is the minor-axis moment of inertia, J the St. Venant torsional constant, “d” the plate depth, and Lc the cantilever length.

 
NOTE: In Advantage Steel #44, this column referenced the expressions for the elastic lateral-torsional buckling moment of cantilevers provided in the Guide to Stability Design Criteria for Metal Structures, 6th Edition. In comparison with recent studies using finite element analyses, the expression “Mc = 1.5GJ/d” gives unconservative values for plates (rectangular section) and long cantilevers of I-sections prone to lateral-torsional buckling. It should not be used for plate cantilevers significantly longer than twice their depth.
QUESTION: (SUMMER2012) In the design of continuous beams and Gerber beams can I assume the inflection points are laterally braced against lateral-torsional buckling?

ANSWER: One must not confuse the inflection points in the vertical bending moment diagram with the inflection points in the laterally buckled shape. In general, the buckled shape is not known at the design stage. Since the inflection points in the bending moment diagram generally do not coincide with those of the buckled shape they should not be taken as laterally braced unless they are braced.

                                        – Compression2017-10-03T15:35:25-05:00

(See General – Stability)

                                        – Shear2017-10-03T15:35:48-05:00
QUESTION: (WINTER2014/2015) How is the shear resistance for gross section of gusset plates determined – should I use Clause 13.4.3 of S16-09 on webs of flexural members not having two flanges or Clause 13.11 on block shear? They give very different results

ANSWER: Neither. Clause 21.12, “Connected elements under combined tension and shear stresses”, a new clause introduced in CSA S16-14, covers this.

                                        – Tension2017-10-03T15:36:01-05:00
QUESTION: (SUMMER2014) I find the design requirements for pin-connected tension members as stipulated in CSA S16-09 very difficult to satisfy. They appear to mandate the use of eyebars. Have I missed something?
ANSWER: The requirements in CSA S16-09 aim to ensure a gross-section yielding ultimate limit state and are therefore quite restrictive. New requirements have been introduced in CSA S16-14. This new provision improves design versatility considerably.
QUESTION: (SPRING2014) When only one leg of an angle tension member is attached to its end supports, with longitudinal fillet welds, how do I determine if shear lag is important and how is it accounted for?
ANSWER: The effect due to shear lag in a tension member is usually accounted for by means of an effective area method. For weld-connected members, Clause 12.3.3.3 of CSA S16-09 applies to members of various cross sections in general. The cross-section area of the angle is divided into two components, i.e., the attached leg and the outstanding leg. Figure 1(a) shows an angle connected by a pair of longitudinal welds of length, L. For the attached leg, shear lag is a factor when L ≤ 2w2. In accordance with Clause 12.3.3.3 (b)(ii) and (iii), its effective net area, An2, as shown in Figure 1(b), is determined based on the weld configuration and, for short welds, also the leg thickness. The effective net area of the outstanding leg, An3, is calculated according to Clause 12.3.3.3(c). Its shear lag effect is given as a function of the ratio of the eccentricity of the weld with respect to the centroid of the outstanding leg, x, to the weld length, L. Then the tensile resistance of the member is calculated in accordance with Clause 13.2(a)(iii) using the total effective net area of the angle section, Ane = An2 + An3.Further information may be found in the CISC Commentary on CSA S16-09 in Part 2 of the Handbook of Steel Construction.
QUESTION: (SPRING2011) Is knife edge angle connection the right choice for axial tension or combined shear and axial tension?
ANSWER: Knife edge angle connection, commonly known as knife connection, is a very common type of beam shear connection. It features a pair of angles that are typically welded to the column in the shop and bolted to the beam web in the field (Figure 1). While knife connection serves as a popular beam shear connection, its use is not recommended where significant axial tensile forces are to be transmitted, such as end connections for braced frame members and collectors that are subjected to significant axial tensile forces. Research studies, reported in the reference below, have demonstrated that knife connection exhibits limited axial tensile resistance. In the reference below, the test results of several other common beam shear connections subjected to combined shear and axial forces were also reported.
 
Reference: Guravich, S. J. and Dawe, J. L. 2006. Simple beam connections in combined shear and tension. Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering. 33(4): 357-372.
Figure 1: Knife Edge Connection
                                        – Torsion2017-10-03T15:36:21-05:00
QUESTION: (SUMMER2015) How are the torsional constants calculated for open sections in the CISC Handbook? Using general strength of material formulas, I can reproduce the values for angles, but I obtain different values for other shapes.

ANSWER: Torsional section properties found in the Handbook include the St. Venant constant (J) and the warping constant (Cw). General formulas do not usually incorporate the contributions of the round fillets at the intersection of the web and flange(s) in open sections, as shown in Figure 1. The fillets are not taken into account for angle sections, but they are included for other open sections such as wide flange and Tee shapes.

While the warping constant is not significantly affected by the fillets, the St. Venant constant is significantly increased, and calculations in the Handbook are based on the following reference: El Darwish, I.A. and Johnston, B.G. 1965. Torsion of Structural Shapes. ASCE Journal of the Structural Division, Vol. 91, ST1. (Errata: ASCE Journal of the Structural Division, Vol. 92, ST1, 1966)
 
            – Fatigue2017-10-03T15:38:55-05:00
QUESTION: (WINTER2014/2015) What is the correct fatigue ‘Detail Category’ for a coped beam detail? S16-14 shows Category E1 whereas W59-13 and S16-09 show Category B
ANSWER: Category E1 should apply to re-entrant corners of copes having a minimum radius of 35 mm and ground smooth as stipulated in S16-14. Category B should not be used unless the design stress range is amplified with an appropriate stress concentration factor, which is a function of the size of re-entrant corner radius and finishing.
Figure: Beam with a Cope Detail
QUESTION: (SUMMER2014) Are bolted moment connections used in a canopy structure required to be slip critical? My question relates to a situation where slip critical connections are not required for deflection control. I have many years of connection design experience but seldom had to provide slip-critical connections for wind-load resisting braced bents or moment frames.
ANSWER: The key question here is whether fatigue is a consideration; will the structure be subjected to repetitive loading and stress reversal? A relatively light canopy type of structure subjected to gusty local wind load may experience stress reversal and a significant number of load cycles to warrant such assessment. The judgement rests with the engineer responsible for the design of the structure. Fatigue design is covered in Clause 26 of S16.
QUESTION: (FALL2010) CSA Standard S6, Canadian Highway Bridge Design Code, requires that cross-frame connection plates be connected to the flanges of bridge girders. The bolted detail, as shown (in Figure 1), appears to be quite popular in rehabilitation work. I heard that this bolted detail qualifies for a “Category B“ fatigue detail, but it is not clear to me how simply bolting the stiffener to the bottom flange makes things better because the web weld is still present.

ANSWER:Where the stiffener also serves as a cross-frame connection plate, both distortion-induced fatigue and load-induced fatigue should be considered. The bolted detail as shown does not alter the stiffener-to-web welded fatigue detail with respect to load-induced fatigue because this welded detail remains “Category C1”. However, connecting the connection plate to the flanges (when done correctly) should improve the distortion-induced fatigue resistance substantially.

In order to avoid welded attachments in the tension flange, many older welded steel bridge girders feature cross-frame connection plates that were either cut short from, or ground to bear on, the tension flange. This outdated practice inadvertently resulted in the web taking out-of-plane stresses due to relative displacements of adjacent girders. These stress ranges, typically unaccounted for in the analyses, have been identified as the common cause of distortion-induced fatigue damage to welded bridge girders. Recent editions of CSA S6 require that cross-frames and diaphragms be connected to each flange for a minimum force of 90 kN.

            – HSS2017-10-03T15:39:42-05:00
QUESTION: (2014) What are the key characteristics of ASTM A1085 HSS as compared to A500 Grade C and CSA G40.20/21 products?

ANSWER: In a nutshell, ASTM A1085 HSS are produced to meet requirements comparable to those of CSA G40.20/21 350WT Category 1. The material is required to conform to a minimum average Charpy V-notch impact value of 25 ft-lb at 40°F (approximately 34 J at 4°C), as represented by the test specimen. In addition, a maximum yield stress at 70 ksi (approximately 485 MPa) as well as a minimum yield stress at 50 ksi (345 MPa) apply. Minimum corner radius control is another measure unique to A1085 square and rectangular HSS. All in all, A1085 HSS are superior to A500 products in various aspects.

QUESTION: (2014) What sectional properties may I use for the design of ASTM A1085 HSS?

ANSWER: Wall-thickness and mass tolerances for ASTM A1085 products are essentially the same as those specified for HSS in CSA G40.20-13. Hence sectional properties provided for CSA G40.20 HSS in the CISC Handbook of Steel Construction, which are calculated from nominal wall thickness, depth, width and diameter, may be used for design. Since A1085 is a new standard, it is not included in Clause 5.1.3 of S16-09; until it is covered, use of A1085 may require Approval in accordance with Clause 5.1.1.

QUESTION: (2014) How do I determine the factored axial compressive resistance of an ASTM A1085 HSS column?

ANSWER:  Since the manufacturing method for A1085 HSS is also permitted for the manufacturing of Class C CSA G40.20 HSS, the factored axial compressive resistance of an A1085 HSS column may be determined in accordance with Clause 13.3.1 with the value of n taken as 1.34. The factored axial compressive resistance tables for Class C G40.20 HSS Columns in the CISC Handbook of Steel Construction may be used provided an adjustment for the small difference in Fy values (345 MPa vs. 350 MPa) is accounted for. Purchasers of A1085 HSS may specify heat treatment, as a Supplemental Requirement S1, which also conforms to the stress-relieve requirement for Class H G40.20 HSS. Hence an n-value of 2.24 may be used for A1085 HSS supplied with Supplemental Requirement S1.
However, use of notch-tough steel as gravity columns is an exception.

QUESTION:  (2014) Are ASTM A1085 products readily available?

ANSWER: ASTM A1085 is a new standard, introduced in 2013. Atlas Tube Canada ULC has started taking orders in 2013. Time will tell if they will be readily available from service centres.

            – Other2017-10-03T15:44:02-05:00
QUESTION: (SUMMER2011) What are the major differences between Welded Wide Flange sections and welded I-girders?

ANSWER: Limitations for WWF shapes versus welded I-girders

  • WWF shapes are restricted to a maximum depth of 2,000 mm.
  • WWF shapes are standardized sections, whereas plate girder cross-sectional dimensions may vary.
  • WWF shapes are straight members.
  • WWF shapes have a limit on built-in camber (though they can be quite versatile).
  • The web-to-flange weld strength of WWF shapes is limited to the capacity of a 20 mm web.
  • A cross-section change involves splicing 2 WWF sections, whereas a plate girder cross-section change may involve changing the size of 1, 2 or 3 plates.
  • Butt-welded splices are permitted in WWF production; when fatigue is a design consideration the production splice details must be accounted for.

Dimensional tolerances:WWF shapes are supplied to the requirements of CSA G40.20, whereas welded shapes should comply with W59 requirements. These standards share essentially identical tolerance requirements for length, camber, web flatness, combined warpage and tilt and lateral deviation between centreline of web and centreline of flange at contact surface. The under-tolerances for section depth are also identical. W59 has no provision for flange width tolerances, but G40.20 does. It should also be noted that tension testing of the web-to-flange welds is part of the WWF production requirements.

            – Stability2017-10-11T14:35:01-05:00
QUESTION: (SUMMER2016) I am proportioning a mono-symmetric I-girder whose web-slenderness, h/w, marginally satisfies the Class 3 limit for W-shapes in pure bending in accordance with Table 2 of S16-09. Does this limit apply to mono-symmetric sections?

ANSWER: No, the limits for I-sections are provided in Table 2 of S16-09 for sections with equal flanges. CSA Standard S6, Canadian Highway Bridge Design Code, in Clause 10.10.3.1, addresses Class 3 web-limits for mono-symmetric I-sections. In this clause, the value of h is replaced by 2dc, where dc is the distance from the neutral axis to the compressive extreme fibre (see Figure).

QUESTION:  (2015) When using the direct method in accordance with Clause 9.2.6.2 of CSA S16-14, I was surprised to find that, for a given column force, Cf, the bracing force, Pb, increases as the number of braces is increased from 1 to 2. Does this make sense?

ANSWER: Intuitively, it would seem that adding braces to stabilize a compression member should reduce the brace force per brace, as there are more braces to “share” the stabilizing forces. But in fact, the opposite is true. It should be noted that the brace forces in two adjacent braces do not act in the same direction but the opposite is true (Figure 1). Given a column force, Cf, and in compliance with a maximum permitted out-of-plumbness, ∆0/L, the bracing force, Pb, is directly proportional to the factor β, which takes on values of 2 and 3 for 1 and 2 equally spaced braces respectively. In this case, the brace force, Pb, increases by 50%.

QUESTION:  (SUMMER2014) I am designing a building structure consisting of a simple gravity frame and a perimeter rigid frame, which serves as the lateral-force resisting system. There is no braced bay or shear wall. Several gravity columns are subjected to significant bending about the strong axis due to a large connection eccentricity. Should these wide-flange columns be designed as beam-columns of an unbraced frame? How are the values for U1x determined?

ANSWER: No, this is a braced-frame situation. Despite the absence of braced bent, the gravity columns are ‘leaners’, i.e. they do not participate as primary lateral-force resisting members. The U1x values can be calculated in accordance with Clause 13.8.4 of CSA S16 but the U1x values for determination of cross-sectional strength and lateral-torsional buckling strength must not be less than 1.0.

QUESTION:  (SPRING2014) I heard about the notional load requirement in the design of building structures but I cannot locate the notional load provision in the building code. Where do I find them?

ANSWER: You will find the provision for notional loads in CSA Standard S16-09, Design of Steel Structures. The Standard permits the second order effects due to gravity loads acting on the displaced structure under horizontal loads to be accounted for by using a P-delta analysis. In addition, the effects due to out-of-plumbness and partial yielding may be approximated by a set of horizontal loads, which are referred to as notional loads. The notional load to be applied at each level in addition to any other horizontal load is taken as 0.5 per cent of the concurrent gravity load acting on that level. Alternatively, a rigorous second-order analysis that accounts for both geometric nonlinearity, including out-of-plumbness, and partial yielding may be used.

QUESTION:  (FALL2013) When checking flexural buckling of a channel section under axial load, what radius of gyration should be used to calculate Fex and Fey?

ANSWER:  In S16-09 Clause 13.3.2, the elastic buckling stresses are given by:

For singly-symmetric sections such as channels, the same clause specifies that the y-axis is taken as the axis of symmetry. But when using the tables of properties and dimensions for channels in Part 6 of the Handbook of Steel Construction, the x-axis is defined as the axis of symmetry. Therefore, Fex should be calculated using the radius of gyration ry as given in the Handbook tables, and likewise Fey should be calculated using rx.

QUESTION:  (FALL2012) How do I determine the elastic bending resistance of a cantilever plate subject to lateral-torsional buckling?

ANSWER: For a fix-ended plate subject to bending about its strong axis but laterally unbraced, the Guide to Stability Design Criteria for Metal Structures, 6th Edition (R.D. Ziemian, John Wiley & Sons, 2010) gives expressions for the elastic buckling moment (Mu), depending on the height of load application. For example, when subjected to a point load at its tip (see Figure):

a) For top surface loading:
 
b) For shear centre loading:
 
where E and G are the elastic and shear modulii respectively, Iy is the minor-axis moment of inertia, J the St. Venant torsional constant, “d” the plate depth, and Lc the cantilever length.
 

NOTE:
In Advantage Steel #44, this column referenced the expressions for the elastic lateral-torsional buckling moment of cantilevers provided in the Guide to Stability Design Criteria for Metal Structures, 6th Edition. In comparison with recent studies using finite element analyses, the expression “Mc = 1.5GJ/d” gives unconservative values for plates (rectangular section) and long cantilevers of I-sections prone to lateral-torsional buckling. It should not be used for plate cantilevers significantly longer than twice their depth.

QUESTION: (SUMMER2012) In the design of continuous beams and Gerber beams can I assume the inflection points are laterally braced against lateral-torsional buckling?

ANSWER:  One must not confuse the inflection points in the vertical bending moment diagram with the inflection points in the laterally buckled shape. In general, the buckled shape is not known at the design stage. Since the inflection points in the bending moment diagram generally do not coincide with those of the buckled shape they should not be taken as laterally braced unless they are braced.

QUESTION: (SUMMER2012) I have used the effective-length method to design columns in sway-permitted frames as well as those in sway-prevented frames. But I cannot find the effective-length nomograph for sway-permitted frames in CSA Standard S16. Is the effective-length method still valid?

ANSWER: 

The effective column length method attempts to approximate the elastic critical column load for a regular frame that is without primary moments and consists of identical beams in each level and identical columns (see Figure 2). This idealized frame model does not account for any second-order effects in the beams at all. Moreover, in comparison with modern analysis methods that account for second-order effects etc., it usually fails to provide accurate results for real frames. Since the introduction of S16.1-M89, the Standard has abandoned the effective length design method for sway-permitted frames. Accordingly, the nomograph for sway-permitted frames has since been excluded.

When an elastic analysis is used, the current standard, S16-09, requires the application of a second-order analysis that directly accounts for sway effects. Alternatively, P-delta effects are included using the amplification factor, U2. In addition, notional loads are applied to account for the effects of partial yielding and initial out-of-plumbness.

Note: When P-delta effects and notional loads are accounted for, the use of an effective column length for sway-prevented case (K ≤ 1) is permitted for consideration of lateral-torsional buckling. However, it is assumed in the effective length method that all members remain elastic prior to buckling. Hence the strong-column-weak-beam requirements for non-conventional construction, where applicable, may render its use inappropriate.

QUESTION: (SPRING2012) When I use the amplifier, U2, to account for P-Δ effects in accordance with S16, should I apply U2 to amplify the notional loads as well?

ANSWER:  Yes, notional loads should also be amplified when U2 is used to account for P-Δ effects.

QUESTION: Part A: (FALL2011) How do I calculate the axial compressive resistance of a member subject to elastic local buckling?

ANSWER: Two methods are provided in CSA Standard S16-09, the effective area method and the effective yield stress method.

Effective area method
Engineers are generally familiar with the concept of effective area when designing columns subject to elastic local buckling. Such sections are expected to undergo local buckling before reaching the yield load in axial compression, AFy. They are designed in accordance with CSA S16-09 Clause 13.3.5 (a) whenever the width-to-thickness ratio of the flanges or web exceeds the limits given in Table 1 of S16-09. When calculating the axial compressive resistance, a portion or portions of the cross-section is considered ineffective and is therefore omitted. Considering a wide-flange section, for example, the effective cross-sectional area, Ae, is computed as follows: If the flanges exceed the maximum width-to-thickness ratio of Table 1, the area of the tips (shaded parts in the figure shown) is removed, such that the remaining effective flange width, be, meets the maximum ratio; similarly, the effective web depth is taken as he as shown in the figure. The effective portions of the flanges and web together make up the effective area, Ae.
 
 

Effective yield stress method
Perhaps less familiar is the effective yield stress method, which S16-09 also permits for calculating the axial compressive resistance. According to this concept first introduced in S16-01, the cross-sectional area remains intact, but the yield stress is reduced to account for local buckling. The effective yield stress, Fye, is taken as the reduced yield stress determined from the width-to-thickness ratio meeting the limit in Table 1. If both the flanges and the web are subject to elastic local buckling, two separate effective yield stresses are calculated. For simplicity, the member resistance is based on the lower of the two values.

QUESTION: Part B: (FALL2011) Do the methods provided in CSA S16-09 give the same answer?

ANSWER: 

ANSWER: No, the effective area method and the effective yield stress method, in general, do not give the same answer. An example is presented below to illustrate both methods. Consider a laterally supported W360x72 column (L = 0) made of ASTM A992 steel. The cross-sectional area is A = 9100 mm2 and the specified yield stress, Fy, = 345 MPa. The factored axial compressive resistance will be determined on the basis of (1) effective area and (2) effective yield stress.

(1) Effective area method
Check the width-to-thickness ratios of the flanges and web:
 
The flanges are not subject to local buckling.
 
The web is subject to elastic local buckling. The effective web depth is given by:
 
The effective area is: 
 
And the compressive resistance is:
 
(2) Effective yield stress method
The effective yield stress is based on the maximum width-to-thickness ratio of the web:
And the compressive resistance is:
 
Although only the web is subject to local buckling, the entire cross-section is affected by the reduced yield stress. For this reason, the effective area method results in a greater resistance (for a laterally braced member) than the effective yield stress method in this particular example. However, the effective yield stress method usually gives a larger resistance for slender members.For both methods, the elastic buckling stress, Fe, is determined using gross section properties.
 
QUESTION: Part C: (FALL2011) Which method is used to calculate the values for sections subject to elastic local buckling in the Column Tables and Angle Strut Tables in the CISC Handbook?

ANSWER: Both methods are used to calculate the factored compressive resistances, Cr, for W-columns subject to elastic local buckling and the tabulated values are the larger of the two. Only the effective area method is used to calculate the Cr values for other columns and struts. Angle sections that exceed the maximum b-to-t limit in Table 1 are excluded from the star-shaped angle strut tables.

            – Steel Properties & Grades2017-10-03T15:40:38-05:00
QUESTION: (SUMMER2016) For wide-flange sections used for building construction, should I specify CSA G40.21 Grade 350W or ASTM A992?

ANSWER: ASTM A992/992M should be specified. It is the grade that North American wide-flange mills produced to and CSA Standard S16-14 (and S16-09) explicitly recognize. Introduced in the 1990s as a product with enhanced properties for seismic applications, A992 is produced to additional controls for mechanical properties, such as a maximum yield stress limit and a maximum yield-to-tensile strength ratio. ASTM A992/992M steel is also preferred for greatest sourcing flexibility although mills in North America would certify their products destined for Canada to CSA G40.21 350W as well as ASTM A992/A992M.

QUESTION: (FALL2015) I am involved with the design of an unenclosed industrial structure for which neither the building code nor the bridge code applies. Should I specify notch-tough steel? Are notch-tough W-shapes available? How do I determine the appropriate level of notch-toughness?

ANSWER: Brittle fracture is a complex subject. In order to limit the probability of its occurrence to an acceptable level, one should account for the consequence of failure together with many influential factors as described in Annex L of CSA S16-14. Notch toughness of steel is only one of these factors. Often, fracture control for structures other than buildings and bridges involves identifying the safe options then choosing the most viable solution. Hence the engineer(s) who is responsible for the design, construction specifications and supervision, QA, QC, recommendation for future inspections, etc. is in the best position to make this decision.

With respect to steel grades and their availability, this is the current situation. Although common structural steels, such as CSA G40.21 Types W and A steels generally possess notch toughness that is superior to many steel products used for non-structural applications, they are not produced to meet specific impact testing requirements. Types WT and AT steels are. Purchasers of Types WT and AT steels must also specify the required notch-toughness category that establishes the Charpy V-notch test temperature and energy level. Similarly, purchasers of ASTM steel grades, such as A992, must specify the appropriate test temperature and energy level if they so desire. To our knowledge, a North American mill produces W-sections up to about 440 kg/m to notch-toughness requirements comparable to CSA 350WT Cat. 3. It should be noted that Charpy V-notch test requirements add cost and lead time. Therefore, they should not be specified indiscriminately.

QUESTION: (SPRING2012) When CSA G40.21 300W steel strip is specified as the material for light braces in a building structure, can commercial grade steel products be used instead? What if they are supplied with a test report showing yield stress values matching or exceeding 300 MPa?

ANSWER: No. The reasons include:

a) Commercial grade steel sheet and strip are not produced to meet mandatory mechanical properties, such as minimum yield point, tensile strength and elongation; and
b) Strength levels reported on mill test certificates should not be used as the basis for design. See Clause 5.1.2 of CSA Standard S16-09.

            – Steel Supply2017-10-03T15:40:53-05:00
QUESTION: (2015) What are the most common grades for structural steel shapes and sections used in building construction?

ANSWER: The main contributing factors are: a) their suitability for the intended applications as recognized by codes and standards, and b) availability. A summary for common structural steel grades used for building construction is shown in the table below:

It should be noted that an A500 HSS is not an exact substitution for its G40.21 350W counterpart having the same nominal size designation, mainly due to the less stringent ASTM A500 under-mass tolerance and, in some cases, lower tensile strength properties.

QUESTION: (FALL2015) I am involved with the design of an unenclosed industrial structure for which neither the building code nor the bridge code applies. Should I specify notch-tough steel? Are notch-tough W-shapes available? How do I determine the appropriate level of notch-toughness?

ANSWER: Brittle fracture is a complex subject. In order to limit the probability of its occurrence to an acceptable level, one should account for the consequence of failure together with many influential factors as described in Annex L of CSA S16-14. Notch toughness of steel is only one of these factors. Often, fracture control for structures other than buildings and bridges involves identifying the safe options then choosing the most viable solution. Hence the engineer(s) who is responsible for the design, construction specifications and supervision, QA, QC, recommendation for future inspections, etc. is in the best position to make this decision.With respect to steel grades and their availability, this is the current situation. Although common structural steels, such as CSA G40.21 Types W and A steels generally possess notch toughness that is superior to many steel products used for non-structural applications, they are not produced to meet specific impact testing requirements. Types WT and AT steels are. Purchasers of Types WT and AT steels must also specify the required notch-toughness category that establishes the Charpy V-notch test temperature and energy level. Similarly, purchasers of ASTM steel grades, such as A992, must specify the appropriate test temperature and energy level if they so desire. To our knowledge, a North American mill produces W-sections up to about 440 kg/m to notch-toughness requirements comparable to CSA 350WT Cat. 3. It should be noted that Charpy V-notch test requirements add cost and lead time. Therefore, they should not be specified indiscriminately.

QUESTION: (2014) Are ASTM A1085 products readily available?

ANSWER: ASTM A1085 is a new standard, introduced in 2013. Atlas Tube Canada ULC has started taking orders in 2013. Time will tell if they will be readily available from service centres.

QUESTION: (SUMMER2011) Why have Welded Wide Flange (WWF) shapes been commonly used in Canada?

ANSWER: The introduction of CSA G40.12 in 1964 marked the beginning of an era for Canadian structural steel. This stronger (300 MPa specified yield) steel replaced ASTM A36 (248 MPa yield) steel as the basic grade for wide-flange shapes, etc. Algoma Steel, the Canadian wide-flange mill at that time, did not produce the full range of W-sections. As a result, the welded wide-flange (WWF) sections were introduced as alternatives for heavy rolled sections.As built-up shapes, the WWF cross-sections can be tailored for optimal efficiency; standard beam sections were compact sections or stockier and all columns were Class 3 or stockier. Because the plates were oxy-flame-cut in Algoma’s facility, their WWF sections were also qualified for the most favourable column design curve (of the three SSRC curves), whereas the least favourable curve applied to heavy A36 W-shapes.The above-mentioned advantages, coupled with the higher strength of the 300 MPa steel, had helped WWF sections to remain popular choices for heavy sections until ASTM A992 (345 MPa specified min. yield) emerged as the common North American steel grade for wide flange shapes about a decade ago. Until recently, WWF sections also benefited from the availability of notch-tough steel plates where required, while rolled shapes, supplied to meet certain notch-toughness requirements, were scarce. Rolled W-shapes, up to 440 kg/m in weight and meeting CSA Type T Category 3 notch-toughness requirements, are now available (subject to minimum tonnage order, etc.). All in all, the clear advantages that WWF shapes once offered have dwindled.

QUESTION: (SUMMER2011) Essar Steel Algoma has closed their WWF production facility. What are the steel designer’s choices?

ANSWER: For several years, another source of WWF sections had supplied the market in western Canada. Following Essar Steel Algoma’s exit, a large fabrication facility in eastern Canada has shown interest in WWF production. The future availability of WWF sections, or lack of, will be sorted out in the marketplace. It should be noted that WWF sections are essentially standardized welded built-up H-shapes (see answer to the question below). Hence they can be replaced with custom-designed welded built-up sections.Here are the current choices: a) North American mills produce ASTM A992 rolled W-shapes up to 1,100 mm in depth, and column sections weigh up to 1,086 kg/m. At current exchange rates, they ought to be very competitive; and b) Welded plate girders for sections deeper than 1,100 mm and where the need to camber heavy rolled girders renders them unsuitable.

Industrial Structures & Platework – Industrial Structures2017-10-03T15:45:16-05:00
QUESTION: (FALL2015) I am involved with the design of an unenclosed industrial structure for which neither the building code nor the bridge code applies. Should I specify notch-tough steel? Are notch-tough W-shapes available? How do I determine the appropriate level of notch-toughness?

ANSWER: Brittle fracture is a complex subject. In order to limit the probability of its occurrence to an acceptable level, one should account for the consequence of failure together with many influential factors as described in Annex L of CSA S16-14. Notch toughness of steel is only one of these factors. Often, fracture control for structures other than buildings and bridges involves identifying the safe options then choosing the most viable solution. Hence the engineer(s) who is responsible for the design, construction specifications and supervision, QA, QC, recommendation for future inspections, etc. is in the best position to make this decision.

With respect to steel grades and their availability, this is the current situation. Although common structural steels, such as CSA G40.21 Types W and A steels generally possess notch toughness that is superior to many steel products used for non-structural applications, they are not produced to meet specific impact testing requirements. Types WT and AT steels are. Purchasers of Types WT and AT steels must also specify the required notch-toughness category that establishes the Charpy V-notch test temperature and energy level. Similarly, purchasers of ASTM steel grades, such as A992, must specify the appropriate test temperature and energy level if they so desire. To our knowledge, a North American mill produces W-sections up to about 440 kg/m to notch-toughness requirements comparable to CSA 350WT Cat. 3. It should be noted that Charpy V-notch test requirements add cost and lead time. Therefore, they should not be specified indiscriminately.

Seismic & Wind Effects – Seismic2017-10-03T15:44:25-05:00
QUESTION: (SUMMER2016) In National Building Code of Canada 2015, the period dependant Site Coefficient F(T), used for determination of seismic Design Spectral Accelerations, has replaced Site Coefficients Fa and Fv. CSA Standard S16-14, however, continues to reference Site Coefficients, Fa and Fv. Is S16-14 out of step with NBC 2015?

ANSWER: CSA S16-14 is compatible with NBC 2015. In S16-14, coefficients Fa and Fv, appear in two expressions: the short-period specified spectral acceleration ratio, IEFaSa(0.2), and the one-second specified spectral acceleration ratio, IEFvSa(1.0). Certain values of these quantities serve as triggers for more stringent requirements whereas other values set the conditions for relaxation. Although F(T) has replaced Fa and Fv for the purpose of determination of Design Spectral Accelerations in NBC 2015 the Code retains the expressions IEFaSa(0.2) and IEFvSa(1.0) as triggers. As defined in Sentence 4.1.8.4. (7) of NBC 2015, Fa = F(0.2) and Fv = F(1.0). Ideally, F(0.2) and F(1.0) should also replace Fa and Fv respectively in these trigger expressions. This was not possible in the 2015 code cycle for the following reason: In order to be considered for adoption by NBC 2015, CSA material design standards, S16, A23.3 etc., must be published in 2014. However, changes proposed for NBC, including the period dependant Site Coefficient F(T), could not be finalized in time to meet the publication schedule for the CSA standards.

QUESTION: (FALL2012) When designing bolted connections, are seismic loads considered to be static or cyclic?

ANSWER:The Seismic Corner article entitled “Bolted Connections for Seismic Applications” in CISC publication, Advantage Steel No. 31 (Summer 2008), outlined the requirements for bolted connections for seismic applications in accordance with S16-01. The article is available at: https://cisc-icca.ca/ciscwp/product/advantage-steel-no-31/

In NBC 2010 and S16-09, the building height restriction for Conventional Construction where the specified short-period spectral acceleration, IEFaSa(0.2), exceeds 0.35 has been increased. The above mentioned requirements for bolted connections also apply to these taller structures of Conventional Construction.

                                  – Wind2017-10-03T15:44:37-05:00
QUESTION: (SPRING2012) The User’s Guide – NBC Structural Commentaries provides external peak pressure-gust coefficient values, in Figures I-8 to I-14, for design of cladding and secondary structural members. Should these values or those tabulated in Figure I-7 be used for the design of a primary roof girder in a low-rise building?

ANSWER: The values tabulated in Figure I-7 apply to the design of lateral-load resisting systems for low-rise buildings when wind load acting simultaneously on all surfaces is considered. In the NBC Structural Commentaries, the wind effects in such loading conditions are termed “primary” structural actions whereas structural members subjected to local external pressure (or suction) are referred to as “secondary” members. Local peak gust pressure/suction values are significantly larger than the effective gust pressure acting on the whole building. Therefore, the coefficient values in Figure I-7 should not be used for the design of a roof girder unless it is a member of a rigid frame or a part of a braced frame and the effects due to “primary” wind actions govern the design.

Généralités – Calcul général2017-04-20T15:42:03-05:00
QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2015) Comme cela est indiqué dans le Commentaire sur la norme S16-09, les expressions d’élancement prévues à la Clause 13.3.3 pour les « pièces comprimées à une seule cornière » ne sont pas destinées aux contreventements dans les cadres contreventés. Je veux utiliser des contreventements comprimés à ailes égales dans un cadre contreventé. Comment dimensionne-t-on ces contreventements à une seule cornière?

RÉPONSE: Les contreventements à une seule cornière sont généralement utilisés comme contreventements en traction seulement en raison de leur résistance limitée à la compression. Pour résister à une forte compression avec une seule aile assemblée, ils doivent être dimensionnés comme des poteaux soumis à des charges excentriques. Dans ce cas, la clause 13.3.2 traite des résistances au flambement en flexion et en flexiontorsion et la Clause 13.8.3 traite de la compression et de la flexion axiales combinées.

QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2013) Lors du contrôle du flambement en flexion d’un profilé en C sous une sollicitation axiale, quel rayon de giration doit être utilisé pour calculer Fex et Fey?ge?

RÉPONSE: Selon S16-09, article 13.3.2, les contraintes de flambement élastique sont les suivantes:

Pour les sections à simple symétrie tels que les profilés en C, le même article précise que l’axe y est considéré comme étant l’axe de symétrie. Dans les tables de propriétés et de dimensions des profilés en C de la partie 6 du Handbook of Steel Construction, c’est l’axe x qui est défini comme étant l’axe de symétrie. Par conséquent, Fex devra être calculé en utilisant le rayon de giration ry fourni dans les tables du Handbook, de même Fey sera calculé en utilisant rx.

QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2012) Autrefois, il y avait une disposition de calcul de structure traditionnel qui permettait de dimensionner les cadres rigides en proportion des charges latérales, indépendamment des charges de gravité. Cette méthode empirique est-elle reconnue par la norme S16 actuelle ?

RÉPONSE: Non. Depuis l’introduction de la norme CSA S16-01, toutes les charges coexistantes sont spécifiées dans S16 et les combinaisons de charges CNB sont censées agir simultanément (sauf si une charge variable compense les effets de la charge principale, auquel cas la charge variable doit être exclue de la combinaison de charges).

QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2011) Conformément au Code national du bâtiment, les systèmes de bâtiment en acier devront être fabriqués par des entreprises possédant la certification CSA A660 « Certification des fabricants de systèmes de bâtiment en acier ». Cette exigence s’applique-t-elle à tous les fabricants d’acier?ng plants?

RÉPONSE: Non, la norme CSA A660 ne s’applique pas à tous les fabricants d’acier. Un système de bâtiment d’acier comporte de l’acier pour les éléments de charpente ainsi que des accessoires conçus et fabriqués pour produire un système de bâtiment total, qu’on appelle souvent « bâtiment métallique préfabriqué » et pour lequel le fabricant est responsable aussi bien de la conception structurale que de la fabrication du système de bâtiment. Puisque le concepteur du système de bâtiment en acier est également le vendeur, il n’y a pas de tierce partie indépendante représentant les intérêts du public. La norme CSA A660 vise à s’assurer que le fabricant de systèmes de bâtiment en acier se conforme au code du bâtiment et aux normes de conception applicables, et que le public est protégé. La grande majorité des fabricants d’acier de charpente canadiens fabriquent des structures de bâtiments qui sont conçues par des ingénieurs employés par d’autres. Ces fabricants ne sont pas tenus d’obtenir la certification CSA A660. En revanche, ils sont certifiés CSA W47.1 « Certification des compagnies de soudage par fusion de l’acier ». Certains possèdent aussi la Certification qualité de l’ICCA pour la fabrication de l’acier.

Pour plus d’information, visitez :http://www.cisc-icca.ca/certification.

Généralités – Autres2017-04-20T15:35:59-05:00
QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2011) Quelles sont les principales différences entre les profilés assemblés soudés WWF et les poutres en I soudées?

RÉPONSE: Voici quelques-unes des principales différences: Restrictions pour les profilés assemblés soudés WWF par rapport aux poutres en I soudées

  • Les profilés assemblés soudés WWF sont limités à une profondeur maximum de 2 000 mm.
  • Les profilés assemblés soudés WWF sont des sections normalisées, alors que les dimensions transversales des poutres assemblées peuvent varier.
  • Les profilés assemblés soudés WWF sont des éléments droits.
  • La cambrure intégrée des profilés assemblés soudés WWF est limitée (même s’ils sont assez polyvalents).
  • La résistance des soudures de l’âme aux ailes des profilés assemblés soudés WWF est limitée à la capacité d’une âme de 20 mm.
  • Une modification transversale implique l’épissure de deux profilés assemblés soudés WWF, alors que la modification transversale d’une poutre assemblée peut nécessiter le changement d’une, de deux ou de trois plaques.
  • Les épissures soudées de bout en bout sont permises dans la production des profilés assemblés soudés WWF; lorsque la fatigue est un facteur de conception, les détails de l’épissure doivent être pris en compte.
Généralités – Rupture fragile2017-10-03T16:47:00-05:00
QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2015) Je suis impliqué dans le calcul d’une structure industrielle non fermée pour laquelle ni le code du bâtiment ni le code de calcul des ponts ne s’appliquent. Dois-je prescrire un acier résistant à l’entaille? Existe-t-il des profilés en W résistants à l’entaille? Comment puis-je déterminer le niveau de résistance à l’entaille qui convient?

RÉPONSE: La rupture fragile est un sujet complexe. Pour maintenir la probabilité qu’elle se produise à un niveau acceptable, il convient de tenir compte des conséquences d’une défaillance, ainsi que des nombreux facteurs prépondérants décrits à l’annexe L de CSA S16-14. La résistance à l’entaille de l’acier n’est que l’un de ces facteurs. Souvent, la prévention des fractures pour des structures autres que des bâtiments et des ponts consiste à identifier les options les plus sûres puis à choisir la solution la plus faisable. Par conséquent, le ou les ingénieurs chargés du calcul, des spécifications et de la supervision de la construction, de l’AQ, du CQ, des recommandations relatives aux futures inspections, etc. sont les mieux placés pour prendre cette décision.

Concernant les nuances d’acier et leur disponibilité, la situation actuelle est la suivante. Bien que les aciers de charpente courants, tels que les aciers CSA G40.21 de types W et A présentent généralement une résistance à l’entaille supérieure à celle de nombreux produits en acier utilisés pour des applications non structurelles, ils ne sont pas produits pour répondre à des exigences d’essai Charpy particulières. Les aciers de types WT et AT le sont. Les acheteurs d’aciers de types WT et AT devront également préciser la catégorie de résistance à l’entaille qui établit la température et le niveau d’énergie de l’essai de résilience Charpy V. De même, les acheteurs de nuances d’acier ASTM, telles que A992, devront préciser la température et le niveau d’énergie appropriés pour l’essai le cas échéant. À notre connaissance, les aciéries nordaméricaines produisent des profilés en W pouvant aller jusqu’à environ 440 kg/m conformes à des exigences de résistance à l’entaille comparables à CSA 350WT Cat. 3. On notera que la conformité aux exigences de l’essai de résilience Charpy V tend à accroire les coûts et les délais de livraison. Par conséquent, ces aciers ne devront pas être prescrits au hasard.

Généralités – Fatigue2017-04-20T15:26:01-05:00
QUESTION: (HIVER2014/2015) Quelle est la bonne « catégorie de détail » pour la résistance à la fatigue d’une poutre contre-profilée? D’après la norme S16-14, c’est la Catégorie E1, alors que pour les normes W59-13 et S16-09, c’est la Catégorie B.
RÉPONSE: La Catégorie E1 devrait s’appliquer aux angles rentrants des entailles ayant un rayon minimum de 35 mm et meulées, tel que stipulé dans la norme S16-14. La catégorie B ne doit pas être utilisée sauf si l’étendue des contraintes est amplifiée avec un coefficient de concentration des contraintes, lequel dépend de la taille du rayon des angles rentrants et de la finition.
Figure: POUTRE CONTRE-PROFILÉE
QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2014) Les assemblages rigides boulonnés utilisés dans une marquise doivent-ils être anti-glissement? Ma question fait référence à une situation où les assemblages anti-glissement ne sont pas indispensables pour le contrôle de la flèche. Je possède de nombreuses années d’expérience dans le calcul des assemblages, mais j’ai rarement eu à travailler sur des assemblages anti-glissement pour des portiques contreventés ou des cadres rigides résistant aux charges dues au vent.
RÉPONSE: La question fondamentale qui se pose ici est de savoir si la fatigue doit être prise en considération et si la charpente sera soumise à des charges répétitives et à des contraintes alternées. Une marquise relativement légère soumise à des charges dues à un vent soufflant par rafales peut subir des contraintes alternées et un nombre important de cycles de charges pour justifier une telle évaluation. La décision revient à l’ingénieur chargé des calculs. La conception en fatigue est traitée à la clause 26 de la norme S16.
QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2010) La norme CSA-S6, Code canadien sur le calcul des ponts routiers, stipule que les plaques d’assemblage de traverses doivent être fixées aux semelles des poutres de pont. Le détail boulonné, tel qu’illustré à la Figure 1, semble aujourd’hui assez populaire dans les travaux de restauration. Il paraît que ce détail boulonné peut être considéré « catégorie de détail B » pour la fatigue, mais je ne vois pas très bien comment le boulonnage du raidisseur à la semelle inférieure améliore l’assemblage, puisque la soudure d’âme est toujours présente.

RÉPONSE: Lorsque le raidisseur remplit également la fonction de plaque d’assemblage de traverse, il faut tenir compte de la fatigue induite par déformation et de la fatigue due à la charge. Le détail boulonné illustré ici ne modifie pas le détail de fatigue soudé raidisseur-âme pour ce qui concerne la fatigue due à la charge car ce détail soudé reste un détail de « catégorie C1 ». Cependant, le raccordement de la plaque d’assemblage aux semelles (s’il est effectué correctement) devrait améliorer consid- érablement la résistance à la fatigue induite par déformation.

Afin d’éviter les soudures à la semelle en traction, de nombreuses poutres soudées sur les ponts en acier plus anciens comportent des plaques d’assemblage des traverses qui ont été coupées juste avant la semelle en traction ou meulées de manière à prendre appui sur celle-ci. À cause de cette pratique aujourd’hui démodée, l’âme a subi des contraintes hors plan dues au déplacement relatif des poutres. L’amplitude de ces contraintes, qui n’est généralement pas prise en compte dans les analyses, est considérée comme la cause principale des dommages provoqués par la fatigue induite par déformation des poutres de pont soudées. Les récentes éditions de la norme CSA-S6 stipulent que les traverses et les diaphragmes doivent être assemblés à chaque semelle pour résister à une force minimum de 90 kN.

Généralités – Revêtements et protection anti-corrosion2017-04-19T17:10:00-05:00
QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2010) Norme CISC/CPMA 1-73a et norme CISC/CPMA 2-75: Quels sont leurs points communs et leurs différences?
RÉPONSE: Ces normes présentent essentiellement les mêmes exigences en laboratoire. La principale différence réside dans la disposition concernant la préparation des surfaces. Outre l’enlèvement de la graisse et de l’huile conformément à SSPC SP1, la norme CISC/CPMA 2-75 stipule également le nettoyage en conformité avec SSPC SP7, décapage-brossage par projection. Lorsque la norme CISC/CPMA 2-75 est utilisée pour l’apprêt, il faut s’assurer de la compatibilité avec la couche de finition. La norme CISC/CPMA 1-73a s’applique à la peinture en une couche et non aux apprêts.
Généralités – Structures mixtes2017-04-19T17:06:09-05:00
QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2011) Dois-je envisager une action mixte totale pour les poutres mixtes dans les charpentes de bâtiments? Sinon, par où dois-je commencer?

RÉPONSE: En raison de l’augmentation substantielle de la résistance à la flexion que procure l’action mixte, une action mixte partielle pour les poutres devrait suffire. La taille des poutres d’acier et la proportion d’action mixte sont souvent déterminées par des facteurs autres que les états limites ultimes de la poutre mixte:

  1. Pour profiter de l’un des avantages de la construction en acier, les poutres ne sont pas étayées. Dans ce cas, les charges de construction peuvent gouverner;
  2.  Les nervures du tablier étant généralement perpendiculaires à la poutre, comme on le voit sur la Figure 2 (il est recommandé d’utiliser un tablier à nervures larges pour obtenir une capacité optimale en cisaillement des goujons), la conception avec action mixte totale nécessite souvent de placer plusieurs goujons par nervure, ce qui sous-utilise les goujons en raison du chevauchement des cônes de cisaillement du béton; et
  3.  La conception pourra dépendre de la flèche due à la surcharge ou des vibrations de plancher.

Conformément à la norme S16-09, un degré de connexion au cisaillement de 40 % ou plus doit être fourni pour profiter d’une résistance mixte. En raison des facteurs mentionnés plus haut, la majorité des poutres mixtes sont conçues pour un degré de connexion au cisaillement de 40 % à 60 %. Toutefois, les poutres principales mixtes sont généralement connectées pour une capacité mixte supérieure parce que les nervures du tablier sont parallèles aux poutres et que, pendant la construction, les poutres principales sont supportées latéralement par les poutres secondaires (Figure 3). Lorsque l’action mixte est requise uniquement pour des raisons de rigidité, la norme S16 autorise un degré de connexion au cisaillement minimal de 25 %.

Figure 2: Nervures du Tablier Perpendiculaires à la Poutre

 

 Figure 3: Nervures du Tablier Parallèles à la Poutre Principale

 

Généralités – Profilés tubulaires2017-04-20T16:03:09-05:00
QUESTION: (2014) Quelles sont les principales caractéristiques d’un profilé tubulaire (HSS) ASTM A1085 par rapport aux produits A500 Grade C et CSA G40.20/21?

RÉPONSE: En bref, les profilés HSS ASTM A1085 répondent à des exigences comparables à celles de CSA G40.20/21 350WT Catégorie 1. Le matériau devra satisfaire une valeur moyenne minimale de 25 pi-lb à 40 °F (environ 34 J à 4 °C) à l’essai de résilience Charpy, effectué sur éprouvette entaillée en V. En outre, une limite élastique maximale de 70 ksi (485 MPa environ) et une limite élastique minimale de 50 ksi (345 MPa) sont également imposées. L’imposition d’un rayon minimal des angles est un autre critère propre aux sections tubulaires carrées et rectangulaires A1085. Globalement, les profilés HSS A1085 sont supérieurs aux produits A500 sous divers aspects.

QUESTION: (2014) Quelles caractéristiques de section puis-je utiliser pour le calcul d’un profilé HSS ASTM A1085?SS?

RÉPONSE: Les tolérances d’épaisseur de paroi et de masse pour les produits ASTM A1085 sont essentiellement les mêmes que celles indiquées pour les profilés tubulaires dans CSA G40.20-13. Par conséquent, les caractéristiques fournies pour les profilés tubulaires CSA G40.20 dans le Handbook of Steel Construction de l’ICCA, qui sont calculées à partir de valeurs nominales d’épaisseur de paroi, de profondeur, de largeur et de diamètre, peuvent être utilisées pour le calcul. Comme A1085 est une norme nouvelle, elle n’est pas incluse dans l’article 5.1.3 de S16-09; tant qu’elle n’est pas couverte, l’utilisation d’A1085 peut être sujette à approbation en vertu de l’article 5.1.1.

QUESTION: (2014) Comment puis-je déterminer la résistance pondérée à la compression axiale d’un poteau en profilé tubulaire ASTM A1085?A1085 HSS column?

RÉPONSE: Dans la mesure où la méthode de fabrication des profilés HSS A1085 est également admissible pour la fabrication de profilés HSS CSA G40.20 de Classe C, la résistance pondérée à la compression axiale d’un poteau HSS A1085 peut être déterminée suivant 13.3.1 avec une valeur de n égale à 1,34. Les tableaux illustrant la résistance pondérée à la compression axiale pour les poteaux HSS G40.20 de Classe C dans le Handbook of Steel Construction de l’ICCA peuvent être utilisées sous réserve d’un ajustement prenant en considération la petite différence dans les valeurs de Fy (345 MPa au lieu de 350 MPa). Les acheteurs de profilés HSS A1085 peuvent spécifier un traitement thermique, en tant qu’exigence supplémentaire S1, qui est également conforme à l’exigence de relaxation des contraintes pour les profilés HSS G40.20 de Classe H. Par conséquent, une valeur de n de 2,24 peut être utilisée pour les profilés HSS A1085 sujets à l’exigence supplémentaire S1. Toutefois, l’emploi d’acier à résilience améliorée pour des poteaux de gravité reste une exception.

QUESTION:  (2014) Les produits ASTM A1085 sont-ils faciles à trouver?le?

RÉPONSE: L’ASTM A1085 est une norme nouvelle, lancée en 2013. Atlas Tube Canada ULC a commencé à en prendre commande en 2013. L’avenir dira si ces produits se généraliseront parmi les centres de distribution.

Généralités – Stabilité2017-10-20T17:00:23-05:00
QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2016) Je calcule les proportions d’une poutre en I monosymétrique dont l’élancement de l’âme, h/w, respecte de façon marginale la limite de classe 3 pour les profilés en W en flexion pure selon le tableau 2 de la norme S16-09. Cette limite s’applique-t-elle aux profilés monosymétriques? apply to mono-symmetric sections?

RÉPONSE: Non, les limites pour les profilés en I fournies dans le tableau 2 de la norme S16-09 s’appliquent aux profilés à ailes égales. La norme CSA S6, le Code canadien sur le calcul des ponts routiers, aborde les limites de classe 3 relatives à l’âme des profilés en I monosymétriques à l’article 10.10.3.1. Dans cet article, la valeur de h est remplacée par 2dc, dc représentant la distance de l’axe neutre à la fibre extrême en compression (voir la figure).

QUESTION:  (2015) En utilisant la méthode directe conformément à l’article 9.2.6.2 de la norme CSA S16-F14, j’ai été surpris de constater que, pour un effort dans le poteau (Cf) donné, l’effort de contreventement (Pb) augmente lorsqu’on passe de un à deux contreventements. Est-ce que je comprends bien?sense?

RÉPONSE: Intuitivement, on pourrait croire que d’ajouter des contreventements pour stabiliser une pièce comprimée devrait réduire les forces appliquées sur chaque contreventement puisqu’ils sont plus nombreux à « partager » ces forces. C’est pourtant le contraire qui se produit. Il faut noter que les forces d’appui de deux contreventements adjacents n’agissent pas dans la même direction, mais font plutôt le contraire (Figure 1). Avec un effort dans le poteau (Cf) donné et en respectant la tolérance d’aplomb maximum (∆0/L), l’effort de contreventement (Pb) est directement proportionnel au facteur β, qui prend des valeurs de 2 et 3 pour 1 et 2 contreventements positionnés à intervalles réguliers, respectivement. Dans ce cas, l’effort de contreventement (Pb) augmente de 50 %.

QUESTION:  (ÉTÉ2015) Comme cela est indiqué dans le Commentaire sur la norme S16-09, les expressions d’élancement prévues à la Clause 13.3.3 pour les « pièces comprimées à une seule cornière » ne sont pas destinées aux contreventements dans les cadres contreventés. Je veux utiliser des contreventements comprimés à ailes égales dans un cadre contreventé. Comment dimensionne-t-on ces contreventements à une seule cornière?

RÉPONSE: Les contreventements à une seule cornière sont généralement utilisés comme contreventements en traction seulement en raison de leur résistance limitée à la compression. Pour résister à une forte compression avec une seule aile assemblée, ils doivent être dimensionnés comme des poteaux soumis à des charges excentriques. Dans ce cas, la clause 13.3.2 traite des résistances au flambement en flexion et en flexiontorsion et la Clause 13.8.3 traite de la compression et de la flexion axiales combinées.

QUESTION:  (2014) Je calcule la résistance à la flexion d’une section à symétrie simple en I non maintenue latéralement et ayant des semelles d’épaisseurs différentes. Quelle doit être la valeur de t dans les expressions de βx et de Cw fournies dans l’alinéa 13.6 (e) de S16-09?

RÉPONSE: Dans les deux expressions, la valeur de « d-t » peut être la distance entre les centres de gravité des semelles. Cw peut également être calculée à l’aide de la formule fournie sous Built-up Sections dans la Partie 6 du Handbook of Steel Construction de l’ICCA.

QUESTION:  (ÉTÉ2014) Je suis en train de concevoir une charpente de bâtiment comportant un simple cadre gravitaire et un cadre rigide périmétrique servant de système de résistance aux forces horizontales. Il n’y a pas de baie contreventée ni de mur à effet de cisaillement. Plusieurs poteaux gravitaires sont soumis à un moment de flexion important selon l’axe fort en raison d’une excentricité prononcée de l’assemblage. Ces poteaux à ailes larges devraient-ils être conçus comme les assemblages poutrepoteau d’un cadre non contreventé? Comment calcule-t-on les valeurs pour U1x?

RÉPONSE: Non, il s’agit ici d’un cadre contreventé. Malgré l’absence d’un portique contreventé, les poteaux gravitaires ne sont pas des éléments essentiels du système de résistance aux forces horizontales. On peut calculer les valeurs U1x selon la clause 13.8.4 de la norme CSA S16 mais en veillant à ce que les valeurs U1x pour la résistance transversale et la résistance au déversement ne soient pas inférieures à 1.0.

QUESTION:  (PRINTEMPS2014) J’ai entendu parler de l’exigence de charge fictive dans le calcul des charpentes de bâtiment mais je ne parviens pas à trouver la disposition concernant les charges fictives dans le code du bâtiment. Où puis je la trouver?

RÉPONSE: Vous trouverez la disposition sur les charges fictives dans la norme CSA S16-09, Règles de calcul des charpentes en acier. La norme autorise la prise en compte des effets de deuxième ordre liés aux charges de gravité s’exerçant sur la configuration déplacée d’une structure subissant des charges horizontales au moyen d’une analyse des effets P-delta. En outre, les effets liés à la déstabilisation et à la plastification partielle peuvent être calculés de façon approchée par Nous vous invitons à poser vos questions sur divers aspects de la conception et de la construction des bâtiments en acier. Vous pouvez les soumettre par courriel à faq@cisc-icca.ca. L’ICCA reçoit un très grand nombre de questions; nous ne pouvons en publier que quelques-unes dans cette rubrique. L Outstanding leg (An3) (a) (b) Effective Net Area Figure 1 x w2 Connected leg (An2) L Outstanding leg (An3) (a) (b) Effective Net Area Figure 1 x w2 Connected leg (An2) FIGURE 1 – AIRE NETTE EFFICACE un ensemble de charges horizontales, qui sont qualifiées de charges fictives. La charge fictive à appliquer à chaque étage en plus de toute autre charge horizontale est comptée comme étant égale à 0,5 % de la charge de gravité coexistante exercée sur cet étage. Sinon, une rigoureuse analyse de second ordre prenant en compte à la fois la non-linéarité géométrique, y compris la déstabilisation, et la plastification partielle peut aussi être employée.

QUESTION:  (AUTOMNE2013) Lors du contrôle du flambement en flexion d’un profilé en C sous une sollicitation axiale, quel rayon de giration doit être utilisé pour calculer Fex et Fey?

RÉPONSE: Selon S16-09, article 13.3.2, les contraintes de flambement élastique sont les suivantes:

Pour les sections à simple symétrie tels que les profilés en C, le même article précise que l’axe y est considéré comme étant l’axe de symétrie. Dans les tables de propriétés et de dimensions des profilés en C de la partie 6 du Handbook of Steel Construction, c’est l’axe x qui est défini comme étant l’axe de symétrie. Par conséquent, Fex devra être calculé en utilisant le rayon de giration ry fourni dans les tables du Handbook, de même Fey sera calculé en utilisant rx.

QUESTION:  (AUTOMNE2012) Comment dois-je calculer la résistance élastique à la flexion d’une plaque en porte-à-faux soumise à un déversement?

RÉPONSE: Pour une plaque encastrée soumise à un moment de flexion selon son axe fort mais sans soutien latéral, le Guide to Stability Design Criteria for Metal Structures, 6th Edition (R.D. Ziemian, John Wiley & Sons, 2010) fournit des expressions pour le moment de flambement élastique (Mu), en fonction de la hauteur de du point d’application de la charge. Par exemple, lorsque la plaque est soumise àune charge ponctuelle à son extrémité:

a) Pour une charge sur la surface supérieure »
 
b) Pour une charge au centre de cisaillement:
 
où E et G sont les modules d’élasticité et de cisaillement, respectivement, Iy est l’axe principal d’inertie minimale, « J » la constante de torsion de St-Venant, « d » la profondeur de la plaque et Lc, la longueur du porte-à-faux.
 
NOTE: Dans le numéro 44 de la revue Avantage Acier, cette rubrique fait référence au moment de déversement élastique de porte-à-faux indiqué dans le Guide to Stability Design Criteria for Metal Structures, 6e édition. Comparativement à des études récentes utilisant l’analyse par éléments finis, l’expression « Mc = 1.5GJ/d » offre des valeurs imprudentes pour les plaques (section rectangulaire) et les longs porte-à-faux de profilé en I qui sont sujets au déversement. Il faut éviter de l’utiliser pour les porte-à-faux en plaques qui sont plus longs que le double de leur profondeur.
QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2012) Lors de la conception de poutres continues et de poutres du système Gerber (Figure 1), peut-on déduire les points d’inflexion contreventés latéralement contre le déversement?

RÉPONSE: Il ne faut pas confondre les points d’inflexion dans le diagramme des moments fléchissants verticaux avec les points d’inflexion dans le flambement latéral. En général, on ne connaît pas le flambement latéral au stade de la conception. Les points d’inflexion dans le diagramme des moments fléchissants ne coïncidant pas avec ceux du flambement latéral, ils ne doivent pas être considérés comme étant contreventés latéralement, sauf s’ils sont contreventés.

QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2012) J’ai employé la méthode du coefficient d’élancement pour concevoir des poteaux dans des cadres avec oscillation et des cadres sans oscillation. En revanche, je ne trouve pas le nomogramme du coefficient d’élancement pour les cadres avec oscillation dans la norme CSA S16. La méthode du coefficient d’élancement est-elle toujours valide?

ANSWER: 

La méthode du coefficient d’élancement des poteaux s’efforce de donner une valeur approximative de la charge critique élastique des poteaux dans un cadre ordinaire qui est dépourvu de moments primaires et qui comporte des poutres identiques à chaque niveau et des poteaux identiques (voir la Figure 2). Ce modèle de cadre idéal ne tient absolument pas compte des effets du second ordre dans les poutres. De plus, par rapport aux méthodes d’analyse modernes qui tiennent compte des effets du second ordre, etc., elle est généralement incapable de donner des résultats précis pour les cadres réels. Depuis l’adoption de la norme S16.1-M89, la méthode du coefficient d’élancement a été abandonnée au profit des cadres avec oscillation. C’est pourquoi le nomogramme pour les cadres avec oscillation a été exclu.

Lorsqu’on utilise une analyse élastique, la norme actuelle S16-09 prévoit l’application d’une analyse de second ordre qui tient directement compte des effets de l’oscillation. Par ailleurs, les effets P-delta sont inclus au moyen du coefficient d’amplification (U2). De plus, on applique les charges théoriques pour tenir compte des effets de la plastification partielle et de l’absence d’aplomb initiale.

Remarque : Lorsque les effets P-delta et les charges théoriques sont pris en compte, l’utilisation du coefficient d’élancement des poteaux pour la conception d’un cadre sans oscillation (K ≤ 1) est acceptable aux fins de considération du déversement. Cette méthode suppose toutefois que tous les éléments de la structure conservent leur élasticité avant de flamber. C’est pourquoi les exigences poteaux solides/poutres faibles pour la construction non conventionnelle, le cas échéant, en font une option inadaptée.

QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2012) Lorsque j’utilise le coefficient d’intensification U2 pour tenir compte des effets P- Δ conformément à S16, devrais-je aussi appliquer U2 aux charges conceptuelles?

RÉPONSE: Oui, les charges conceptuelles doivent également être intensifiées lorsque U2 est utilisé pour tenir compte des effets P- Δ.

QUESTION: Part A: (AUTOMNE2011) Comment dois-je calculer la résistance à la compression axiale d’un membre sujet au voilement élastique?

ANSWER: Two methods are provided in CSA Standard S16-09, the effective area method and the effective yield stress method.

La norme CSA S16-09 fournit deux méthodes, soit la méthode de l’aire efficace et la méthode de la limite d’élasticité effective.

Méthode de l’aire efficace

Les ingénieurs sont généralement familiarisés avec le concept d’aire efficace pour le calcul des poteaux soumis au voilement élastique. On s’attend à ce que de telles sections soient sujettes au voilement avant d’atteindre la charge de plastification en compression axiale, AFy. Elles sont calculées selon la Clause 13.3.5 (a) de la norme CSA S16-09 lorsque le rapport de largeur à épaisseur des ailes ou de l’âme dépasse les limites données au Tableau 1 de S16-09. Lors du calcul de la résistance à la compression axiale, une partie de la section est considérée inefficace et est donc omise. Pour une section à larges ailes, par exemple, l’aire efficace de la section, Ae, est calculée comme suit : si les ailes dépassent le rapport maximal de largeur à épaisseur du Tableau 1, l’aire des extrémités (parties ombragées de la figure) est supprimée, de telle façon que la largeur efficace restante de l’aile satisfasse le rapport maximal ; de même, la hauteur efficace de l’âme est prise comme étant he comme on le voit sur la figure. Les parties efficaces des ailes et de l’âme constituent ensemble l’aire efficace, Ae.

Méthode de la limite d’élasticité effective

La méthode de la limite d’élasticité effective est peut-être moins connue. S16-09 autorise également cette méthode pour calculer la résistance à la compression axiale. Selon ce concept, initialement introduit dans S16-01, l’aire de la section reste intacte, mais la limite d’élasticité est réduite pour prendre en compte le voilement. La limite d’élasticité effective, Fye, est prise comme étant la limite d’élasticité réduite déterminée à partir du rapport de largeur à épaisseur respectant la limite du Tableau 1. Si les ailes et l’âme sont toutes les deux sujettes au voilement élastique, deux limites élastiques effectives distinctes sont calculées. Dans un but de simplicité, la résistance du membre est basée sur la plus basse des deux valeurs.

QUESTION: Part B: (AUTOMNE2011) Est-ce que les méthodes fournies dans CSA S16-09 donnent la même réponse?

RÉPONSE: Non, la méthode de l’aire efficace et la méthode de la limite d’élasticité effective ne donnent généralement pas la même réponse. Un exemple est présenté ci-dessous pour illustrer les deux méthodes. Considérons un poteau W360x72 en acier ASTM A992 supporté latéralement (L = 0). L’aire de la section est A = 9100 mm2 et la limite d’élasticité spécifiée, Fy, = 345 MPa. La résistance pondérée à la compression axiale est déterminée sur la base (1) de l’aire efficace et (2) de la limite d’élasticité effective.

(1) Méthode de l’aire efficace
Vérifiez les rapports de largeur à épaisseur des ailes et de l’âme:
 
Les ailes ne sont pas sujettes au voilement.
 
L’âme est sujette au voilement élastique. La hauteur efficace de l’âme est donnée par:
 
L’aire efficace est: 
 
Et la résistance à la compression est: 
 
(2) Méthode de la limite d’élasticité effective
La limite d’élasticité effective est basée sur le rapport maximal de largeur à épaisseur de l’âme:
 
Et la résistance à la compression est: 
 

Bien que seulement l’âme soit sujette au voilement, la section en entier est affectée par la diminution de la limite d’élasticité. Pour cette raison, la méthode de l’aire efficace se solde en une plus grande résistance (pour un élément supporté latéralement) que la méthode de la limite d’élasticité effective dans cet exemple particulier. Toutefois, la méthode de la limite d’élasticité effective produit habituellement une plus grande résistance pour les membres élancés.

Pour les deux méthodes, la contrainte de flambement élastique, Fe, est déterminée à l’aide des propriétés de la section brute.

QUESTION: Part C: (AUTOMNE2011) Quelle méthode est utilisée pour calculer les valeurs des sections sujettes au voilement élastique dans les tableaux de poteaux et les tableaux de contrefiche à cornière dans le Manuel de l’ICCA?

RÉPONSE: Les deux méthodes sont utilisées pour calculer les résistances pondérées à la compression, Cr, pour les poteaux W sujets au voilement élastique et les valeurs sous forme de tableaux sont les plus grandes des deux. Seule la méthode de l’aire efficace est utilisée pour calculer les valeurs de Cr pour d’autres poteaux et contrefiches. Les sections de cornières qui dépassent la limite de b à t du Tableau 1 sont exclues des tableaux de contrefiche à cornière en forme d’étoile.

Généralités – Calcul général – Torsion2017-04-20T16:00:05-05:00
QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2015) Comment calcule-t-on les constantes de torsion pour les profilés ouverts dans le « CISC Handbook »? À partir des formules générales de résistance des matériaux, j’arrive à reproduire les valeurs angulaires, mais j’obtiens des valeurs différentes pour les autres profilés.

RÉPONSE: Les propriétés de torsion des profilés qui se trouvent dans le « Handbook » incluent le moment d’inertie de torsion (J) et la constante de gauchissement (Cw). Les formules générales ne tiennent pas compte des contributions des congés au croisement de l’âme et des semelles dans les profilés ouverts, comme le montre la Figure 1. Les congés ne sont pas pris en compte pour les profilés angulaires, mais ils sont inclus pour les autres profilés ouverts, dont notamment les poutres à ailes larges et les profilés en T.

Bien que la constante de gauchissement ne soit pas affectée de manière significative par les congés, le moment d’inertie de torsion augmente fortement et les calculs dans le « Handbook » se fondent sur la référence suivante : El Darwish, I.A. and Johnston, B.G. 1965 Torsion of Structural Shapes. ASCE Journal of the Structural Division, Vol. 91, ST1. (Errata: ASCE Journal of the Structural Division, Vol. 92, ST1, 1966)
 
Généralités – Calcul général – Effort tranchant; cisaillement2017-04-20T15:41:49-05:00
QUESTION: (HIVER2014/2015) Comment détermine-t-on la résistance pour une section brute de goussets – doit-on utiliser la clause 13.4.3 de la norme S16-09 sur les âmes des éléments fléchis non munis de deux ailes, ou la clause 13.11 sur la rupture en cisaillement? Les résultats sont très différents dans les deux cas.

RÉPONSE: Ni l’une ni l’autre. La clause 21.12 « Éléments assemblés sous contraintes de cisaillement et de traction combinées », qui a été récemment ajoutée à la norme CSA S16-14, couvre cet aspect.

Généralités – Calcul général – Flexion2017-10-20T17:00:27-05:00
QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2016) Je calcule les proportions d’une poutre en I monosymétrique dont l’élancement de l’âme, h/w, respecte de façon marginale la limite de classe 3 pour les profilés en W en flexion pure selon le tableau 2 de la norme S16-09. Cette limite s’applique-t-elle aux profilés monosymétriques?

RÉPONSE: Non, les limites pour les profilés en I fournies dans le tableau 2 de la norme S16-09 s’appliquent aux profilés à ailes égales. La norme CSA S6, le Code canadien sur le calcul des ponts routiers, aborde les limites de classe 3 relatives à l’âme des profilés en I monosymétriques à l’article 10.10.3.1. Dans cet article, la valeur de h est remplacée par 2dc, dc représentant la distance de l’axe neutre à la fibre extrême en compression (voir la figure).

QUESTION: (2014) Je calcule la résistance à la flexion d’une section à symétrie simple en I non maintenue latéralement et ayant des semelles d’épaisseurs différentes. Quelle doit être la valeur de t dans les expressions de βx et de Cw fournies dans l’alinéa 13.6 (e) de S16-09?

RÉPONSE: Dans les deux expressions, la valeur de « d-t » peut être la distance entre les centres de gravité des semelles. Cw peut également être calculée à l’aide de la formule fournie sous Built-up Sections dans la Partie 6 du Handbook of Steel Construction de l’ICCA.

QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2012) Comment dois-je calculer la résistance élastique à la flexion d’une plaque en porte-à-faux soumise à un déversement?nal buckling?

RÉPONSE: Pour une plaque encastrée soumise à un moment de flexion selon son axe fort mais sans soutien latéral, le Guide to Stability Design Criteria for Metal Structures, 6th Edition (R.D. Ziemian, John Wiley & Sons, 2010) fournit des expressions pour le moment de flambement élastique (Mu), en fonction de la hauteur de du point d’application de la charge. Par exemple, lorsque la plaque est soumise à une charge ponctuelle à son extrémité:

a) Pour une charge sur la surface supérieure:

b) Pour une charge au centre de cisaillement:

où E et G sont les modules d’élasticité et de cisaillement, respectivement, Iy est l’axe principal d’inertie minimale, « J » la constante de torsion de St-Venant, « d » la profondeur de la plaque et Lc, la longueur du porte-à-faux.

NOTE: Dans le numéro 44 de la revue Avantage Acier, cette rubrique fait référence au moment de déversement élastique de porte-à-faux indiqué dans le Guide to Stability Design Criteria for Metal Structures, 6e édition. Comparativement à des études récentes utilisant l’analyse par éléments finis, l’expression « Mc = 1.5GJ/d » offre des valeurs imprudentes pour les plaques (section rectangulaire) et les longs porte-à-faux de profilé en I qui sont sujets au déversement. Il faut éviter de l’utiliser pour les porte-à-faux en plaques qui sont plus longs que le double de leur profondeur.
QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2012) Lors de la conception de poutres continues et de poutres du système Gerber (Figure 1), peut-on déduire les points d’inflexion contreventés latéralement contre le déversement?

RÉPONSE: Il ne faut pas confondre les points d’inflexion dans le diagramme des moments fléchissants verticaux avec les points d’inflexion dans le flambement latéral. En général, on ne connaît pas le flambement latéral au stade de la conception. Les points d’inflexion dans le diagramme des moments fléchissants ne coïncidant pas avec ceux du flambement latéral, ils ne doivent pas être considérés comme étant contreventés latéralement, sauf s’ils sont contreventés.

Généralités – Calcul général – Compression2017-04-19T14:51:23-05:00

(voir Stabilité)

Généralités – Calcul général – Traction2017-04-19T14:45:57-05:00
QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2014) Les exigences relatives aux pièces tendues goupillées stipulées à la norme CSA S16-09 me paraissent extrêmement difficiles à respecter. Si je comprends bien, elles imposent l’utilisation de barres à œil. Est-ce que je me trompe?
RÉPONSE: Les exigences stipulées à la norme CSA S16-09 visent à garantir un état limite ultime de la plastification de la section brute et sont donc assez restrictives. De nouvelles exigences ont été introduites dans la norme CSA S16-14. Cette nouvelle disposition améliore considérablement la souplesse de la conception.
QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2014) Si une seule aile d’une cornière travaillant en traction est reliée à ses supports d’extrémité au moyen de soudures d’angle longitudinales, comment puis-je déterminer si le décalage en cisaillement est important et comment est-il pris en compte?
RÉPONSE: L’effet dû au décalage en cisaillement dans une pièce en traction est habituellement évalué en utilisant une méthode de calcul selon la surface utile. Pour les éléments assemblés par soudage, l’article 12.3.3.3 de CSA S16-09 s’applique à des éléments de sections diverses en général. L’aire de la section transversale de la cornière est divisée en deux composantes, à savoir l’aile fixée et l’aile saillante. La Figure 1(a) montre une cornière assemblée par une paire de soudures longitudinales de longueur L. Pour l’aile reliée, le décalage en cisaillement est un facteur si L ≤ 2w2. En vertu de l’article 12.3.3.3 (b) (ii) et (iii), sa surface utile nette An2, représentée à la Figure 1(b), est fonction de la configuration des soudures et, pour les soudures courtes, également de l’épaisseur de l’aile. La surface utile nette de l’aile saillante An3 se calcule conformément à l’article 12.3.3.3(c). Son décalage en cisaillement est une fonction du rapport de l’excentricité de la soudure par rapport au centre de gravité de l’aile saillante x sur la longueur de la soudure L. Ensuite, la résistance à la traction de l’élément est calculée conformément à l’article 13.2(a)(iii) en utilisant la surface utile totale de la section de cornière Ane = An2 + An3.Vous trouverez de plus amples renseignements dans le Commentaire ICCA sur la norme CSA S16-09 dans la Partie 2 du << Handbook of Steel Construction >>.
QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2012) Si des pannes à semelle large sont également soumises à une traction axiale importante transmise par l’assemblage de la semelle inférieure aux supports au moyen de deux files transversales de boulons de haute résistance, comment doisje tenir compte du cisaillement différentiel ? En particulier, pour l’aire nette efficace Ane, doit-on prendre la valeur 0,75An, conformément à la Clause 12.3.3.2 (c) (ii) de S16-09?
RÉPONSE: Cela n’est pas une approche prudente. Dans cette situation, l’effet du cisaillement différentiel est plus sévère que dans le cas de cornières assemblées par une aile au moyen de deux lignes transversales d’organes d’assemblage. Par conséquent, Ane < 0,60An. D’un autre côté, la limite inférieure de Ane peut être fixée à Anf, où Anf est l’aire nette de la bride assemblée seule. Ainsi, Ane doit être choisie quelque part entre Anf et 0,60An.
QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2011) Est-il approprié d’utiliser un assemblage à cornières doubles pour reprendre une traction axiale ou une combinaison de cisaillement et de traction axiale?
RÉPONSE: L’assemblage à cornières doubles est un type d’assemblage en cisaillement très courant. Il comporte une paire de cornières qui sont généralement soudées au poteau en atelier et boulonnées à l’âme des poutres au chantier (Figure 1). Bien que l’assemblage à cornières doubles soit un type d’assemblage en cisaillement très prisé, son utilisation est déconseillée lorsque la transmission d’un effort de traction axiale important est requise, par exemple pour les assemblages d’extrémité des poutres de cadres contreventés et les poutres collectrices soumises à des forces de traction axiale considérables. Les études citées dans la référence ci-dessous ont démontré que les assemblages à cornières doubles présentent une résistance à la traction axiale limitée. Dans la référence ci-dessous, les résultats des essais de plusieurs assemblages de poutres en cisaillement soumis conjointement à des forces axiales et à des forces en cisaillement sont également présentés.Référence : Guravich, S. J. and Dawe, J. L. 2006. Simple beam connections in combined shear and tension. Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering. 33(4): 357-372.
 
Référence : Guravich, S. J. and Dawe, J. L. 2006. Simple beam connections in combined shear and tension. Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering. 33(4): 357-372.
Figure 1: Assemblage à cornières doubles
Généralités – Approvisionnement en acier2017-04-19T14:33:39-05:00
QUESTION: (2015) Quelles sont les nuances les plus courantes pour les formes et les profilés en acier de charpente utilisés dans la construction de bâtiments?

RÉPONSE: Les principaux facteurs sont : a) leur aptitude pour les applications prévues, telles que définies par les codes et les normes en vigueur, et b) leur disponibilité. Le tableau ci-dessous présente un résumé des nuances d’acier de charpente ordinaires utilisées dans la construction de bâtiments :

Il convient de préciser qu’un profilé A500 HSS n’est pas un remplacement exact du G40.21 350W ayant la même taille nominale, principalement en raison d’une tolérance de masse moins stricte pour l’ASTM A500 et, dans certains cas, des propriétés de résistance à la traction plus faibles.

QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2015) Je suis impliqué dans le calcul d’une structure industrielle non fermée pour laquelle ni le code du bâtiment ni le code de calcul des ponts ne s’appliquent. Dois-je prescrire un acier résistant à l’entaille? Existe-t-il des profilés en W résistants à l’entaille? Comment puis-je déterminer le niveau de résistance à l’entaille qui convient?ness?

RÉPONSE: La rupture fragile est un sujet complexe. Pour maintenir la probabilité qu’elle se produise à un niveau acceptable, il convient de tenir compte des conséquences d’une défaillance, ainsi que des nombreux facteurs prépondérants décrits à l’annexe L de CSA S16-14. La résistance à l’entaille de l’acier n’est que l’un de ces facteurs. Souvent, la prévention des fractures pour des structures autres que des bâtiments et des ponts consiste à identifier les options les plus sûres puis à choisir la solution la plus faisable. Par conséquent, le ou les ingénieurs chargés du calcul, des spécifications et de la supervision de la construction, de l’AQ, du CQ, des recommandations relatives aux futures inspections, etc. sont les mieux placés pour prendre cette décision. Concernant les nuances d’acier et leur disponibilité, la situation actuelle est la suivante. Bien que les aciers de charpente courants, tels que les aciers CSA G40.21 de types W et A présentent généralement une résistance à l’entaille supérieure à celle de nombreux produits en acier utilisés pour des applications non structurelles, ils ne sont pas produits pour répondre à des exigences d’essai Charpy particulières. Les aciers de types WT et AT le sont. Les acheteurs d’aciers de types WT et AT devront également préciser la catégorie de résistance à l’entaille qui établit la température et le niveau d’énergie de l’essai de résilience Charpy V. De même, les acheteurs de nuances d’acier ASTM, telles que A992, devront préciser la température et le niveau d’énergie appropriés pour l’essai le cas échéant. À notre connaissance, les aciéries nordaméricaines produisent des profilés en W pouvant aller jusqu’à environ 440 kg/m conformes à des exigences de résistance à l’entaille comparables à CSA 350WT Cat. 3. On notera que la conformité aux exigences de l’essai de résilience Charpy V tend à accroire les coûts et les délais de livraison. Par conséquent, ces aciers ne devront pas être prescrits au hasard.

QUESTION: (2014) Les produits ASTM A1085 sont-ils faciles à trouver?ble?

RÉPONSE: L’ASTM A1085 est une norme nouvelle, lancée en 2013. Atlas Tube Canada ULC a commencé à en prendre commande en 2013. L’avenir dira si ces produits se généraliseront parmi les centres de distribution.

QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2011) Pourquoi l’utilisation des profilés assemblés soudés est-elle si répandue au Canada?

RÉPONSE: L’introduction de la norme CSA G40.12 en 1964 a marqué le début d’une nouvelle ère pour l’acier de charpente au Canada. Cet acier plus résistant (limite élastique spécifiée de 300 MPa) a remplacé l’acier ASTM A36 (limite élastique de 248 MPa) comme nuance d’acier de base pour les profilés assemblés soudés. Essar Steel Algoma, seul producteur canadien de profilés assemblés soudés à l’époque, ne produisait pas une gamme complète de profilés W. Les profilés assemblés soudés (WWF, en anglais) ont donc été introduits comme solution de substitution aux profilés laminés lourds.

En tant que profilés composés, les sections soudées peuvent être personnalisées pour un rendement optimal; les sections standard étaient des sections compactes ou plus massives, et tous les poteaux étaient en acier de catégorie 3 ou plus épais. Comme les tôles étaient oxycoupées au chalumeau dans l’usine d’Essar Steel Algoma, les profilés assemblés soudés WWF étaient également qualifiés pour la courbe de poteau la plus favorable (des trois courbes du SSRC, en anglais), tandis que la courbe la moins favorable s’appliquait aux profilés W A36 plus épais.

Les avantages cités ci-dessus, ainsi que la résistance supérieure de l’acier de 300 MPa, ont permis aux profilés assemblés soudés WWF de demeurer une solution de choix pour les profilés lourds, avant que l’acier ASTM A992 (limite élastique spécifiée de 345 MPa) ne s’impose comme la nuance d’acier standard en Amérique du Nord pour les profilés assemblés soudés il y a une dizaine d’années. Jusqu’à récemment, les profilés assemblés soudés WWF bénéficiaient également de la disponibilité de tôles à résistance améliorée, alors que les poutres laminées, fournies pour remplir certaines exigences de résistance améliorée, étaient plutôt rares. Les profilés W laminés, pouvant peser jusqu’à 440 kg/m et répondant aux exigences de résistance améliorée de la norme CSA type T catégorie 3, sont désormais disponibles (pour les commandes de tonnage minimum, etc.). Dans l’ensemble, les avantages offerts autrefois par les profilés assemblés soudés WWF ont peu à peu disparu.

QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2011) Essar Steel Algoma a fermé son usine de production de profilés assemblés soudés WWF. Quels sont maintenant les choix du dessinateur?

RÉPONSE: Pendant plusieurs années, une autre source de profilés assemblés soudés WWF approvisionnait le marché de l’ouest du Canada. Après l’abandon d’Essar Steel Algoma, une importante entreprise de fabrication de l’est du Canada a manifesté son intérêt pour la production de profilés assemblés soudés WWF. La disponibilité future des profilés assemblés soudés WWF sera déterminée par le marché. Il convient de rappeler que les profilés assemblés soudés WWF sont des sections en H composées (voir la réponse à la question ci-dessous). Ils peuvent donc être remplacés par des sections composées soudées et conçues sur mesure.

Voici les choix actuels : Les aciéries nord-américaines produisent des profilés W selon la norme ASTM A992 d’une profondeur de 1 100 mm maximum et des sections de poteaux pesant jusqu’à 1 086 kg/m. Avec les taux de change actuels, ils devraient être extrêmement avantageux. Des poutres assemblées soudées pour des profilés de plus de 1 100 mm de profondeur, lorsque la nécessité de cambrer des poutres laminées lourdes les rend inadaptées..

Généralités – Nuances et propriétés2017-04-19T14:17:45-05:00
QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2016) En ce qui a trait aux profilés à larges ailes utilisés dans la construction de bâtiments, devrais-je demander la nuance CSA G40.21 350W ou ASTM A992?

RÉPONSE: Optez pour l’acier ASTM A992/A992M. Il s’agit de la nuance que les aciéries d’Amérique du Nord utilisent pour les profilés à larges ailes. Elle est en outre explicitement reconnue par la norme CSA S16-14 (et S16-09). Apparu dans les années 1990 et présenté comme un produit aux propriétés améliorées pour les applications antisismiques, l’acier A992 est soumis à des contrôles additionnels sur le plan des propriétés mécaniques, comme la contrainte à la limite élastique et le rapport entre la limite élastique et la résistance en traction. L’acier ASTM A992/A992M est également plus facile à obtenir auprès des fournisseurs, même si les aciéries nord-américaines certifient leurs produits destinés au Canada conformément à la norme CSA G40.21 350W en plus de la norme ASTM A992/A992M.

QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2015) Je suis impliqué dans le calcul d’une structure industrielle non fermée pour laquelle ni le code du bâtiment ni le code de calcul des ponts ne s’appliquent. Dois-je prescrire un acier résistant à l’entaille? Existe-t-il des profilés en W résistants à l’entaille? Comment puis-je déterminer le niveau de résistance à l’entaille qui convient?

RÉPONSE: La rupture fragile est un sujet complexe. Pour maintenir la probabilité qu’elle se produise à un niveau acceptable, il convient de tenir compte des conséquences d’une défaillance, ainsi que des nombreux facteurs prépondérants décrits à l’annexe L de CSA S16-14. La résistance à l’entaille de l’acier n’est que l’un de ces facteurs. Souvent, la prévention des fractures pour des structures autres que des bâtiments et des ponts consiste à identifier les options les plus sûres puis à choisir la solution la plus faisable. Par conséquent, le ou les ingénieurs chargés du calcul, des spécifications et de la supervision de la construction, de l’AQ, du CQ, des recommandations relatives aux futures inspections, etc. sont les mieux placés pour prendre cette décision. Concernant les nuances d’acier et leur disponibilité, la situation actuelle est la suivante. Bien que les aciers de charpente courants, tels que les aciers CSA G40.21 de types W et A présentent généralement une résistance à l’entaille supérieure à celle de nombreux produits en acier utilisés pour des applications non structurelles, ils ne sont pas produits pour répondre à des exigences d’essai Charpy particulières. Les aciers de types WT et AT le sont. Les acheteurs d’aciers de types WT et AT devront également préciser la catégorie de résistance à l’entaille qui établit la température et le niveau d’énergie de l’essai de résilience Charpy V. De même, les acheteurs de nuances d’acier ASTM, telles que A992, devront préciser la température et le niveau d’énergie appropriés pour l’essai le cas échéant. À notre connaissance, les aciéries nordaméricaines produisent des profilés en W pouvant aller jusqu’à environ 440 kg/m conformes à des exigences de résistance à l’entaille comparables à CSA 350WT Cat. 3. On notera que la conformité aux exigences de l’essai de résilience Charpy V tend à accroire les coûts et les délais de livraison. Par conséquent, ces aciers ne devront pas être prescrits au hasard.

QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2012) Si de la bande d’acier CSA G40.21 300W est spécifiée en tant que matériau pour les entretoises légères dans une charpente de bâtiment, peut-on utiliser à la place des produits en acier de nuance commerciale ? Qu’en est-il s’ils sont fournis avec un rapport d’essai montrant des valeurs de limite élastique égales ou supérieures à 300 MPa?

RÉPONSE: Non. Les raisons sont notamment les suivantes :

a) Les tôles et bandes d’acier de nuance commerciale ne sont pas produites pour présenter des propriétés mécaniques obligatoires telles que limite élastique minimale, contrainte de rupture et allongement.

b) Les valeurs de résistance figurant dans les certificats d’essai des aciéries ne doivent pas être utilisées pour les calculs de structure. Voir la Clause 5.1.2 de la norme CSA S16-09.

Généralités – Codes et normes2017-10-03T16:46:33-05:00
QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2016) Dans le Code national du bâtiment – Canada 2015, le coefficient de site F(T) en fonction de la période, utilisé pour le calcul sismique de l’accélération spectrale, a remplacé les coefficients Fa et Fv. La norme CSA S16-14 continue toutefois de faire allusion aux coefficients de site Fa et Fv. La norme CSA S16-14 est-elle déphasée par rapport au CNB 2015?

RÉPONSE: La norme CSA S16-14 est compatible avec le CNB 2015. Dans la norme, les coefficients Fa et Fv apparaissent dans deux expressions : le ratio d’accélération spectrale de courte période, IEFaSa(0.2), et le ratio d’accélération spectrale d’une seconde, IEFvSa(1.0). Certaines valeurs dans ces quantités servent de déclencheurs entraînant des exigences plus strictes, tandis que d’autres se traduisent par des exigences moindres. Bien que F(T) ait remplacé Fa et Fv aux fins de la détermination de l’accélération spectrale dans le CNB 2015, celui-ci conserve les expressions IEFaSa(0.2) et IEFvSa(1.0) comme déclencheurs. Tel que défini à la ligne 4.1.8.4. (7) du CNB 2015, Fa = F(0.2) et Fv = F(1.0). Idéalement, F(0.2) et F(1.0) devraient également remplacer Fa et Fv respectivement dans ces expressions déclencheurs. Cela n’a pas été possible dans le dernier cycle de publication du Code pour la raison suivante : pour que leur adoption soit envisagée au moment de la publication du CNB 2015, les normes CSA de conception des matériaux (S16, A23.3, etc.) devaient être publiées en 2014. Cependant, les changements proposés du CNB, notamment celui du coefficient de site en fonction de la période F(T), n’ont pas pu être terminés à temps pour la publication des normes CSA.

QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2013) Existe-t-il une norme pour les boulons d’ancrage?

RÉPONSE: Oui, la norme ASTM F1554 englobe trois classes de limites d’élasticité pour les boulons d’ancrage : 36 (248 MPa), 55 (380 MPa) et 105 (724 MPa). La grande majorité des boulons d’ancrage (ou des tiges d’ancrage, selon la définition dans la norme CSA S16-09) est utilisée pour positionner, niveler et fixer les socles de poteaux à charge de gravité concentrique.

Traditionnellement, les fabricants ont fourni des tiges « Nous sommes très ­ers de servir les autres manufacturiers américains et canadiens. » PRODUITS DE QUALITÉ FABRIQUÉS AU CANADA NOUS EMMAGASINONS ET FABRIQUONS Boulons A307 hexagonaux, carrés et bombés Structuraux A325 et A490 Chapes et écrous à ailettes Tiges et ‑échissement et tirants FABRICATION DE BOULONS D’ANCRAGE POUR : A307, A193 B7, 4140, Gr5 F1554-36, Gr 55, Gr 105 Bar Gr 50, Gr 60, Gr 75 Fini normal ou galvanisé Rubrique Technique d’ancrage réalisées à partir de ronds produits selon la norme ASTM A36 (ou CSA G40.21 300W). Depuis l’adoption de la norme ASTM F1554, les produits ayant une limite d’élasticité de 36 remplissent ce rôle.Les limites d’élasticité de 55 et 105 sont produites pour satisfaire des résistances prescrites plus élevées. En outre, lorsqu’il est précisé « exigence supplémentaire » dans le bon de commande, elles sont fournies pour satisfaire certains critères bien précis en matière d’essais de résilience Charpy.

QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2013) Quels sont les types de boulons haute résistance les plus couramment utilisés dans la construction de bâtiments?

RÉPONSE: Les boulons A325 de 3/4 po sont aujourd’hui encore très répandus. Certains fabricants/monteurs préfèrent les boulons A325 de 7/8 po, en particulier pour les projets de grande envergure. Les boulons A490 sont de plus en plus souvent utilisés dans la construction de bâtiments. Ils sont généralement choisis pour les assemblages devant résister à des contraintes très élevées tandis que les boulons A325 peuvent être utilisés à d’autres endroits de la structure. Dans ce type d’applications, il faut faire très attention de ne pas poser des boulons A325 dans des trous prévus pour recevoir des boulons A490. Il est donc plus prudent de les spéarer par taille, généralement un quart de pouce de différence en diamètre.Voici quelques combinaisons pratiques:

a) Boulons A490 de 1 po pour les assemblages lourds et boulons A325 de 3/4 po partout ailleurs; et
b) Boulons A490 de 1 1/8 po pour les assemblages lourds et boulons A325 de 7/8 po partout ailleurs.

Dans les assemblages précontraints, les boulons à couple contrôlé (de type « twist-off ») se sont imposés comme des options acceptables. Les boulons ASTM F1852 et ASTM F2280 (de type « twist-off ») présentent les mêmes résistances ultimes à l’état-limite que, respectivement, les boulons A325 et A490. Toutefois, la norme CSA S16-09 prescrit des valeurs moins élevées pour les coefficients de glissement de 5 pour cent, c1, pour ces assemblages boulonnés de type « twist-off » par rapport aux boulons haute résistance précontraints pour satisfaire la méthode d’installation du tour d’écrou. Pour de plus amples détails sur les boulons ASTM F1852 and ASTM F2280, consultez la rubrique technique FAQ du numéro 38 de la revue Avantage acier. Les boulons A490 et F2280 ne doivent pas être galvanisés.

L’emploi de boulons métriques reste rare, car ces produits sont disponibles uniquement pour les commandes spéciales portant sur une très grande quantité et placées longtemps à l’avance.

QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2010) Norme CISC/CPMA 1-73a et norme CISC/CPMA 2-75 : Quels sont leurs points communs et leurs différences?es?

RÉPONSE: Ces normes présentent essentiellement les mêmes exigences en laboratoire. La principale différence réside dans la disposition concernant la préparation des surfaces. Outre l’enlèvement de la graisse et de l’huile conformément à SSPC SP1, la norme CISC/CPMA 2-75 stipule également le nettoyage en conformité avec SSPC SP7, décapage-brossage par projection. Lorsque la norme CISC/CPMA 2-75 est utilisée pour l’apprêt, il faut s’assurer de la compatibilité avec la couche de finition. La norme CISC/CPMA 1-73a s’applique à la peinture en une couche et non aux apprêts.

Effets sismiques et de vent – Effets de Vent2017-04-19T14:18:24-05:00
QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2012) : Le Guide de l’utilisateur – CNB Commentaires sur le calcul des structures fournit des valeurs de coefficient de rafale-pression extérieure de pointe, dans les Figures I-8 à I-14, pour le calcul d’éléments de charpente secondaires et de revêtement extérieur. Doit-on utiliser ces valeurs ou celles fournies à la Figure I-7 pour le calcul d’une poutre-maîtresse de toiture dans un bâtiment de faible hauteur ?

RÉPONSE: Les valeurs fournies à la Figure I-7 s’appliquent au calcul d’un système de résistance aux charges horizontales pour bâtiment de faible hauteur lorsque la charge due au vent agissant simultanément sur toutes les surfaces est prise en compte. Dans les Commentaires CNB, les effets du vent dans de telles conditions de charge sont assimilés à des actions sur les éléments de charpente « principaux » alors que les éléments de charpente soumis à une pression (ou succion) extérieure locale sont qualifiés de « secondaires ». Les valeurs de rafale-pression/succion locales de pointe sont nettement plus élevées que la pression de rafale effective s’exerçant sur le bâtiment entier. Par conséquent, les valeurs de coefficient de la Figure I-7 ne devraient pas être utilisées pour le calcul d’une poutre maîtresse de toiture sauf si elle fait partie d’un cadre rigide ou d’un cadre contreventé et que les effets dus aux actions « primaires » du vent prédominent le calcul.

 

Effets sismiques et de vent – Effets Sismiques2017-04-19T14:17:36-05:00
QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2016) Dans le Code national du bâtiment – Canada 2015, le coefficient de site F(T) en fonction de la période, utilisé pour le calcul sismique de l’accélération spectrale, a remplacé les coefficients Fa et Fv. La norme CSA S16-14 continue toutefois de faire allusion aux coefficients de site Fa et Fv. La norme CSA S16-14 est-elle déphasée par rapport au CNB 2015?

RÉPONSE: La norme CSA S16-14 est compatible avec le CNB 2015. Dans la norme, les coefficients Fa et Fv apparaissent dans deux expressions : le ratio d’accélération spectrale de courte période, IEFaSa(0.2), et le ratio d’accélération spectrale d’une seconde, IEFvSa(1.0). Certaines valeurs dans ces quantités servent de déclencheurs entraînant des exigences plus strictes, tandis que d’autres se traduisent par des exigences moindres. Bien que F(T) ait remplacé Fa et Fv aux fins de la détermination de l’accélération spectrale dans le CNB 2015, celui-ci conserve les expressions IEFaSa(0.2) et IEFvSa(1.0) comme déclencheurs. Tel que défini à la ligne 4.1.8.4. (7) du CNB 2015, Fa = F(0.2) et Fv = F(1.0). Idéalement, F(0.2) et F(1.0) devraient également remplacer Fa et Fv respectivement dans ces expressions déclencheurs. Cela n’a pas été possible dans le dernier cycle de publication du Code pour la raison suivante : pour que leur adoption soit envisagée au moment de la publication du CNB 2015, les normes CSA de conception des matériaux (S16, A23.3, etc.) devaient être publiées en 2014. Cependant, les changements proposés du CNB, notamment celui du coefficient de site en fonction de la période F(T), n’ont pas pu être terminés à temps pour la publication des normes CSA.

QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2012) Lors du calcul des assemblages boulonnés, les charges sismiques sontelles considérées comme étant statiques ou cycliques?

RÉPONSE: L’article de la Zone sismique intitulé « A ssemblages boulonnés pour applications sismiques » dans le numéro 31 de la revue Avantage Acier (été 2008) décrivait les exigences relatives aux assemblages boulonnés pour les applications sismiques conformément à la norme S16-01. Vous pouvez consulter cet article en cliquant sur le lien ci-dessous : https://cisc-icca.ca/ciscwp/product/advantage-steel-no-31/

Dans le CNB 2010 et la norme S16-09, la restriction en matière de hauteur des édifices pour les constructions conventionnelles où l’accélération spectrale de courte période spécifiée dépasse IEFaSa(0.2), a été relevée. Les exigences s’appliquant aux assemblages boulonnés s’appliquent également à ces structures plus élevées bâties selon des méthodes de construction classique.

Fabrication et montage2017-10-03T16:44:52-05:00
QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2014) Je dois évaluer la conformité au code en vigueur d’une charpente de bâtiment existante. La charpente est en bon état et satisfait les exigences du Code du bâtiment et de la norme CSA S16-09 pour l’utilisation prévue, si ce n’est que les appuis de poteaux comportent deux tiges d’ancrage au lieu de quatre. Dans une partie de la charpente, une rangée de petits poteaux à ailes larges est posée sur un mur en béton. L’axe des abscisses de ces poteaux, les tiges d’ancrage et l’axe du mur sont tous sur le même plan. Il est impossible d’installer quatre tiges d’ancrage dans la configuration normale de ce mur relativement mince. Toutefois, je peux mettre quatre tiges colinéaires par poteau, ce qui suppose d’en ajouter deux. Cette configuration colinéaire est-elle acceptable?

RÉPONSE: Votre question comporte deux aspects:

a) La répartition colinéaire de quatre tiges d’ancrage estelle conforme à la clause 25.2 de la norme S16?
L’exigence qui prévoit un minimum de quatre tiges d’ancrage vise à garantir la sécurité du montage. Les tiges doivent être positionnées de manière à produire un bras de levier suffisant contre le renversement dans plusieurs directions. La clause 25.2 de la norme S16-14 stipule quatre tiges non colinéaires par poteau, sauf si des précautions particulières sont prises. Nous vous invitons à poser vos questions sur divers aspects de la conception et de la construction des bâtiments en acier. Vous pouvez les soumettre par courriel à faq@cisc-icca.ca. L’ICCA reçoit un très grand nombre de questions; nous ne pouvons en publier que quelques-unes dans cette rubrique.

b) La clause 25.2 s’applique-t-elle à une charpente achevée et en service?
Non, c’est une exigence de sécurité qui s’applique au montage.

Assemblages – Bases de Poteau et Tiges D’ancrage2017-04-19T13:51:24-05:00
QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2014) Je dois évaluer la conformité au code en vigueur d’une charpente de bâtiment existante. La charpente est en bon état et satisfait les exigences du Code du bâtiment et de la norme CSA S16-09 pour l’utilisation prévue, si ce n’est que les appuis de poteaux comportent deux tiges d’ancrage au lieu de quatre. Dans une partie de la charpente, une rangée de petits poteaux à ailes larges est posée sur un mur en béton. L’axe des abscisses de ces poteaux, les tiges d’ancrage et l’axe du mur sont tous sur le même plan. Il est impossible d’installer quatre tiges d’ancrage dans la configuration normale de ce mur relativement mince. Toutefois, je peux mettre quatre tiges colinéaires par poteau, ce qui suppose d’en ajouter deux. Cette configuration colinéaire est-elle acceptable?

RÉPONSE: Votre question comporte deux aspects:

a) La répartition colinéaire de quatre tiges d’ancrage estelle conforme à la clause 25.2 de la norme S16?
L’exigence qui prévoit un minimum de quatre tiges d’ancrage vise à garantir la sécurité du montage. Les tiges doivent être positionnées de manière à produire un bras de levier suffisant contre le renversement dans plusieurs directions. La clause 25.2 de la norme S16-14 stipule quatre tiges non colinéaires par poteau, sauf si des précautions particulières sont prises. Nous vous invitons à poser vos questions sur divers aspects de la conception et de la construction des bâtiments en acier. Vous pouvez les soumettre par courriel à faq@cisc-icca.ca. L’ICCA reçoit un très grand nombre de questions; nous ne pouvons en publier que quelques-unes dans cette rubrique.
 
b) La clause 25.2 s’applique-t-elle à une charpente achevée et en service?
Non, c’est une exigence de sécurité qui s’applique au montage.
QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2013) Lorsque des boulons d’ancrage sont utilisés pour transférer le cisaillement latéral dans une assise de poteau, quelle est la taille maximale admissible des trous de l’assise? J’ai lu dans un guide qu’on recommandait généralement un diamètre de trou maximal supérieur de 1,6 mm (1/16 po) au diamètre du boulon d’ancrage mais les entrepreneurs exigent des trous beaucoup plus grands.oles.

RÉPONSE: Habituellement, un ou plusieurs ergots de cisaillement sont utilisés pour transférer les forces de cisaillement importantes entre une assise de poteau et la fondation. Les tiges d’ancrage sont également utilisées, mais généralement pour transférer les cisaillements moindres. L’utilisation de trous de boulon de taille standard, à savoir avec un jeu de 1,6 mm, n’est pas une solution pratique car des trous plus grands sont nécessaires pour respecter les tolérances de pose des tiges d’ancrage, etc. Dans ce cas, des rondelles de conception appropriée à trous de diamètre standard sont soudées, sur le chantier, à la plaque d’assise en position de montage pour transférer la force de cisaillement. La recherche a montré que ces tiges d’ancrage sont sollicitées en flexion ainsi qu’en cisaillement et en traction le cas échéant.

QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2013) Existe-t-il une norme pour les boulons d’ancrage?

RÉPONSE: Oui, la norme ASTM F1554 englobe trois classes de limites d’élasticité pour les boulons d’ancrage : 36 (248 MPa), 55 (380 MPa) et 105 (724 MPa).

La grande majorité des boulons d’ancrage (ou des tiges d’ancrage, selon la définition dans la norme CSA S16-09) est utilisée pour positionner, niveler et fixer les socles de poteaux à charge de gravité concentrique. Traditionnellement, les fabricants ont fourni des tiges d’ancrage réalisées à partir de ronds produits selon la norme ASTM A36 (ou CSA G40.21 300W). Depuis l’adoption de la norme ASTM F1554, les produits ayant une limite d’élasticité de 36 remplissent ce rôle.

Les limites d’élasticité de 55 et 105 sont produites pour satisfaire des résistances prescrites plus élevées. En outre, lorsqu’il est précisé « exigence supplémentaire » dans le bon de commande, elles sont fournies pour satisfaire certains critères bien précis en matière d’essais de résilience Charpy.

Assemblages – Soudures et Soudage2017-04-19T13:46:38-05:00
QUESTION: (2015) L’article 13.13.2.2 de la norme S16-F14 élimine l’exigence liée à la capacité des métaux de base pour les cordons de soudure, sauf lorsqu’on utilise des électrodes de résistance supérieure à l’électrode correspondante. Cela suggère que la résistance nominale de telles électrodes doit être utilisée pour calculer la résistance de la soudure, mais la norme W59-13 exige l’utilisation d’une électrode correspondante dans cette situation. Que devrais-je faire?

RÉPONSE: D’ici à ce que les deux normes soient harmonisées, leurs exigences peuvent être satisfaites en utilisant une électrode correspondante (plus petite) dans une telle situation.

QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2013) Comment le coefficient de réduction de résistance des soudures d’angle multiples, Mw , s’applique-t-il ? Veuillez fournir un exemple.

RÉPONSE:Dans la configuration de soudure illustrée à la Figure 1, des soudures d’angle de 8 millimètres sont utilisées, Xu = 490 MPa et la tôle est en acier G40.21 350W. Noter que la tôle arrière est plus épaisse.
En vertu de CSA S16-09 Clause 13.13.2.2:

Vr = 0.67 ɸw Aw Xu (1.00 + 0.50 sin1.5 θ) Mwoù:
θ = angle de l’axe de la soudure par rapport à la ligne d’action de la force appliquée
Mw = coefficient de réduction de résistance des soudures d’angle multiples

a) Soudure à θ = 60o:

Orientation de la soudure considérée : θ1 = 60o
Orientation de la soudure dans l’assemblage le plus près de 90o : θ2 = θ1 = 60o

 

b) Soudures longitudinales (θ= 0o):

Orientation de la soudure considérée : θ1 = 0o
Orientation de la soudure dans l’assemblage le plus près de 90°: θ2 = 60o

 
c) Résistance de l’ensemble soudé:

 Vr = 2 x 0.67 x 0.67 x 8 x 100 x 0.707 x 0.490 (1.00 + 0.50 sin1.5 0o) 0.895
+ 0.67 x 0.67 x 8 x 120 x 0.707 x 0.490 (1.00 + 0.50 sin1.5 60o) 1.00
= 2 x 111 + 209 = 431 kN

Figure 1: Réduction de résistance pour des soudure d’angle multiple
 
QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2012) Lors du calcul des cordons de soudure en cisaillement, doit-on vérifier la résistance du métal de base au niveau de la face fusionnée?

RÉPONSE: Selon la norme S16-01, la résistance au cisaillement des cordons de soudure est calculée comme étant la moins élevée de : (a) la résistance du métal au niveau de la soudure donnée en fonction de la résistance finale de l’électrode, Xu, et du plan de gorge, Aw et (b) la résistance du métal de base donnée en fonction de sa résistance à la traction, Fu, et de la face fusionnée, Am. À moins d’utiliser des électrodes non appariées, la résistance au métal de base ne régit pas le calcul des joints soumis à une charge longitudinale. Cependant, lorsque l’orientation du cordon de soudure se rapproche de l’élément soumis à la charge transversale, c’est la résistance du metal de base qui régit le calcul en raison de la résistance nettement supérieure du métal de la soudure.

Dans la norme S16-09, il n’est plus nécessaire de vérifier la résistance du métal de base au niveau de la face fusionnée lorsqu’on utilise des électrodes appariées (Clause 13.13.2.2). Des études réalisées à l’Université d’Alberta ont démontré que la résistance du métal de base déterminée à partir de la résistance vierge du métal de base ne représente pas la résistance au cisaillement. Les chercheurs ont souligné que les propriétés du métal de base au niveau de la face fusionnée sont influencées par l’imbrication de la soudure et des métaux de base. À moins d’utiliser des électrodes non appariées, la résistance du métal de base au niveau de la face fusionnée n’a pas besoin d’être vérifiée, quelle que soit l’orientation du cordon de soudure.
 
Pour une liste des électrodes appariées pour les aciers CSA G40.21, voir le tableau 4 dans la norme S16-09
Assemblages – Boulons et Boulonnage2017-04-19T13:41:15-05:00
QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2015) J’ai récemment rencontré des boulons A325 entièrement filetés dans les assemblages d’une charpente de bâtiment. Ces boulons sont-ils autorisés? Présentent-ils les mêmes résistances que des boulons à filetage de longueur normale? Comment sont-ils identifiés après l’installation? Offrent-ils de quelconques avantages?

RÉPONSE:  Les boulons A325 filetés sur la longueur entière sont autorisés en vertu de l’exigence supplémentaire S1 d’ASTM A325. Ils sont limités aux longueurs de boulons inférieures à quatre fois le diamètre nominal.

Résistances des boulons: Dans la mesure où la résistance à la traction repose sur la section filetée (0,75Ab), elle est indépendante de la longueur filetée. Toutefois, la résistance au cisaillement dans les assemblages par contact doit être réduite pour tenir compte de l’interception des filets par le plan de cisaillement. S’ils sont utilisés dans un joint antiglissement avec une grande longueur de serrage, la section de boulon moindre (filetée) sur la longueur de serrage entière influe sur la relation entre la force de serrage et l’allongement du boulon et peut entraîner une réduction de la force de serrage dans le cas où la méthode du tour d’écrou est utilisée. L’importance de cet effet est en cours d’étude.

Identification: La tête du boulon est marquée « A325T » et non « A325 », comme illustré à la Figure 1.

 
Avantages: Ils n’offrent aucun avantage en matière de résistance des boulons. Toutefois, le fabricant et le monteur peuvent estimer leur utilisation intéressante dans certaines situations pour des raisons de commande de pièces et de gestion des stocks, notamment dans les cas où des pièces en acier assemblées de faible épaisseur, et non les boulons, déterminent la résistance au cisaillement de l’assemblage.
 
FIGURE 1 : Boulon A325 fileté sur toute la longueur
QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2015) Quelle est la longueur de boulon minimale requise pour les boulons haute résistance; l’extrémité du boulon doit-elle dépasser de l’écrou une fois qu’il est installé?

RÉPONSE: Les boulons A325 et A490, une fois installés, doivent présenter un engagement suffisant des filets pour réaliser la résistance à la traction du boulon, c’est-à-dire que l’extrémité du boulon doit affleurer la face extérieure de l’écrou ou la dépasser.

QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2015) Les spécifications du RCSC sont-elles obligatoires pour les projets au Canada??

RÉPONSE: La spécification pour les joints de charpente utilisant des boulons à haute résistance du Research Council on Structural Connections (RCSC) fournit des critères de pointe pour le calcul et l’installation de boulons et d’assemblages à haute résistance ASTM. Ces recommandations deviennent obligatoires à partir du moment où elles sont adoptées par le code local. Au Canada, la conception et l’inspection des joints boulonnés et l’installation des boulons à haute résistance doivent être conformes à la norme CSA S6 ou aux spécifications provinciales pour les structures de ponts routiers et à la norme S16 pour les bâtiments et les autres structures. Ces normes adoptent un grand nombre, mais pas toutes les recommandations dans la spécification RCSC, et certainement pas toutes en même temps. De plus, les normes S6 et S16 adoptent les spécifications ASTM pour les boulons et les assemblages de boulons à haute résistance, p. ex. ASTM A325 et F1852. Ces spécifications ASTM renvoient vers d’autres spécifications pertinentes pour les essais, etc.

QUESTION: (HIVER2014/2015) Les résistances pour les boulons en traction et en cisaillement ont sensiblement augmenté par rapport à celles qui figuraient dans le Handbook que j’ai reçu en 2000. Les boulons à haute résistance modernes sont-ils produits pour être plus résistants ou l’augmentation de résistance a-t-elle été justifiée par les essais et les recherches les plus récents?

RÉPONSE: La différence de résistance des boulons aux étatslimites ultimes que vous avez indiquée correspond à l’augmentation du coefficient de résistance des boulons. Lors de l’entrée en vigueur de la première norme de calcul aux états-limites des charpentes en acier (CSA S16.1-74) en 1974, seuls deux coefficients de résistance ont été adoptés. Pour simplifier : 0,90 pour les éléments en acier et 0,67 pour les soudures, les boulons, le béton dans les poutres composites et les connexions au cisaillement. Les études fondées sur des essais et des analyses statistiques semblent indiquer qu’il est possible d’augmenter le coefficient de résistance pour les boulons à haute résistance à 0,80, comme cela a été documenté dans le « Guide to Design Criteria for Bolted and Riveted Joints, Second Edition » (disponible via le lien suivant : http://boltcouncil.org/files/2ndEditionGuide.pdf). Cette augmentation a été introduite dans le Code canadien pour le calcul des ponts routiers lors de la mise en œuvre de la norme CAN/CSA S6-00; le changement a été adopté dans la norme S16 à la publication de la S16-01.

QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2014) Les assemblages rigides boulonnés utilisés dans une marquise doivent-ils être anti-glissement? Ma question fait référence à une situation où les assemblages anti-glissement ne sont pas indispensables pour le contrôle de la flèche. Je possède de nombreuses années d’expérience dans le calcul des assemblages, mais j’ai rarement eu à travailler sur des assemblages anti-glissement pour des portiques contreventés ou des cadres rigides résistant aux charges dues au vent.

RÉPONSE: La question fondamentale qui se pose ici est de savoir si la fatigue doit être prise en considération et si la charpente sera soumise à des charges répétitives et à des contraintes alternées. Une marquise relativement légère soumise à des charges dues à un vent soufflant par rafales peut subir des contraintes alternées et un nombre important de cycles de charges pour justifier une telle évaluation. La décision revient à l’ingénieur chargé des calculs. La conception en fatigue est traitée à la clause 26 de la norme S16.

QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2014) Où puis-je trouver le tableau de couples de serrage standard pour la précontrainte des boulons A325?5 bolts?

RÉPONSE: Le recours à un « tableau de couples de serrage standard » pour la précontrainte des boulons de haute résistance n’est plus en cours depuis des décennies. Lorsqu’une précontrainte est exigée, la norme CSA S16 admet trois méthodes d’installation des boulons:

a) Méthode du tour d’écrou;
b) Utilisation d’assemblages de boulons à couple de serrage contrôlé ASTM F1852; et
c) Utilisation d’un indicateur direct de couple F959.

S16-09 et S16-14 assignent toutes deux une résistance au glissement plus élevée aux boulons installés par la méthode du tour d’écrou que par les autres méthodes pour une surface de contact de classe donnée, par égard à la plus grande précontrainte généralement obtenue à l’aide de la méthode de rotation d’écrou.

QUESTION:  (AUTOMNE2013) Lorsque des boulons ASTM F1852 sont utilisés dans un assemblage en cisaillement par contact conçu pour recevoir des boulons A325 de même dimension, la traction de la vis dans les boulons F1852 résultant de la précontrainte réduit-elle la résistance au cisaillement?

RÉPONSE:  La réponse est non. Comme l’indique la norme CSA S16-09, le boulon dans un joint à boulon à couple de serrage contrôlé ASTM F1852 présente la même résistance ultime au cisaillement qu’un boulon A325 de même dimension. La résistance ultime au cisaillement d’un boulon haute résistance n’est pas modifiée par l’existence d’une prétension initiale dans le boulon.

Le Commentaire sur RCSC Specification for Structural Joints Using High-Strength Bolts offre l’explication suivante:
« Lorsqu’elle est nécessaire, la précontrainte est induite dans un boulon par l’imposition d’un petit allongement axial durant la pose, comme le décrit le Commentaire sur la Section 8. Lorsque le joint est ultérieurement soumis à des efforts de cisaillement, de traction ou d’une combinaison de cisaillement et de traction, les boulons subissent, préalablement à la rupture, d’importantes déformations ayant pour effet de surpasser le petit allongement axial engendré durant la pose, ce qui fait disparaître la précontrainte. Les mesures effectuées lors d’essais en laboratoire confirment que la précontrainte restante si l’effort appliqué est supprimé est essentiellement nulle avant la rupture du boulon en cisaillement (Kulak et al., 1987; pp. 93-94). Par conséquent, la résistance d’un boulon au cisaillement et à la traction n’est pas modifiée par l’existence d’une précontrainte initiale dans le boulon. »

On notera que, pour une classe donnée de surface de contact (Classe A, B ou C), S16-09 assigne une plus petite résistance au glissement aux assemblages par boulons F1852 qu’à ceux par boulons A325 équivalents précontraints par la méthode du tour d’écrou, du fait de la précontrainte plus importante typiquement engendrée par la méthode du tour d’écrou.

QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2013) Quels sont les types de boulons haute résistance les plus couramment utilisés dans la construction de bâtiments?

RÉPONSE: Les boulons A325 de 3/4 po sont aujourd’hui encore très répandus. Certains fabricants/monteurs préfèrent les boulons A325 de 7/8 po, en particulier pour les projets de grande envergure. Les boulons A490 sont de plus en plus souvent utilisés dans la construction de bâtiments. Ils sont généralement choisis pour les assemblages devant résister à des contraintes très élevées tandis que les boulons A325 peuvent être utilisés à d’autres endroits de la structure. Dans ce type d’applications, il faut faire très attention de ne pas poser des boulons A325 dans des trous prévus pour recevoir des boulons A490. Il est donc plus prudent de les spéarer par taille, généralement un quart de pouce de différence en diamètre.

Voici quelques combinaisons pratiques:

a) Boulons A490 de 1 po pour les assemblages lourds et boulons A325 de 3/4 po partout ailleurs; et
b) Boulons A490 de 1 1/8 po pour les assemblages lourds et boulons A325 de 7/8 po partout ailleurs.

Dans les assemblages précontraints, les boulons à couple contrôlé (de type « twist-off ») se sont imposés comme des options acceptables. Les boulons ASTM F1852 et ASTM F2280 (de type « twist-off ») présentent les mêmes résistances ultimes à l’état-limite que, respectivement, les boulons A325 et A490. Toutefois, la norme CSA S16-09 prescrit des valeurs moins élevées pour les coefficients de glissement de 5 pour cent, c1, pour ces assemblages boulonnés de type « twist-off » par rapport aux boulons haute résistance précontraints pour satisfaire la méthode d’installation du tour d’écrou. Pour de plus amples détails sur les boulons ASTM F1852 and ASTM F2280, consultez la rubrique technique FAQ du numéro 38 de la revue Avantage acier. Les boulons A490 et F2280 ne doivent pas être galvanisés.L’emploi de boulons métriques reste rare, car ces produits sont disponibles uniquement pour les commandes spéciales portant sur une très grande quantité et placées longtemps à l’avance.

QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2012) Lors du calcul des assemblages boulonnés, les charges sismiques sontelles considérées comme étant statiques ou cycliques?

RÉPONSE: L’article de la Zone sismique intitulé « A ssemblages boulonnés pour applications sismiques » dans le numéro 31 de la revue Avantage Acier (été 2008) décrivait les exigences relatives aux assemblages boulonnés pour les applications sismiques conformément à la norme S16-01.

Vous pouvez consulter cet article en cliquant sur le lien ci-dessous : https://cisc-icca.ca/ciscwp/product/advantage-steel-no-31/

Dans le CNB 2010 et la norme S16-09, la restriction en matière de hauteur des édifices pour les constructions conventionnelles où l’accélération spectrale de courte période spécifiée dépasse IEFaSa(0.2), a été relevée. Les exigences s’appliquant aux assemblages boulonnés s’appliquent également à ces structures plus élevées bâties selon des méthodes de construction classique.

QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2012) Si des pannes à semelle large sont également soumises à une traction axiale importante transmise par l’assemblage de la semelle inférieure aux supports au moyen de deux files transversales de boulons de haute résistance, comment doisje tenir compte du cisaillement différentiel ? En particulier, pour l’aire nette efficace Ane, doit-on prendre la valeur 0,75An, conformément à la Clause 12.3.3.2 (c) (ii) de S16-09 ?

RÉPONSE: Cela n’est pas une approche prudente. Dans cette situation, l’effet du cisaillement différentiel est plus sévère que dans le cas de cornières assemblées par une aile au moyen de deux lignes transversales d’organes d’assemblage. Par conséquent, Ane < 0,60An. D’un autre côté, la limite inférieure de Ane peut être fixée à Anf, où Anf est l’aire nette de la bride assemblée seule. Ainsi, Ane doit être choisie quelque part entre Anf et 0,60An.

QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2010) J’ai remarqué que les boulons à couple contrôlé (de type « twist-off ») sont de plus en plus répandus. Sont-ils acceptés comme boulons à haute résistance pour les applications structurales? Si oui, quelles sont leurs résistances au cisaillement et à la traction?

RÉPONSE: Effectivement, les boulons/écrous/ rondelles à couple contrôlé (ou « twist-off ») ASTM F1852 sont de plus en plus souvent utilisés dans les assemblages précontraints. Ces boulons présentent un embout cannelé qui, si l’installation est correctement effectuée au moyen d’une clé spéciale, se rompt en torsion lorsque la précontrainte requise est atteinte
(voir Figure 2).

Les boulons ASTM F1852 et F2280 ont des propriétés mécaniques et chimiques équivalentes, respectivement, aux boulons haute résistance A325 et A490. Les spécifications précises peuvent être trouvées dans la norme CSA S16-09, article 22.2.5 et 23.8.4, ainsi que dans le Tableau 3.

Les valeurs tabulées pour la résistance ultime en cisaillement pour assemblages par contact et la résistance en traction des boulons A325 et A490 dans la partie 3 du Handbook peuvent aussi être utilisées, respectivement, pour les boulons F1852 et F2280. Néanmoins, des valeurs moins élevées pour les coefficients de probabilité de glissement de 5 % (c1), sont spécifiées au Tableau 3 de la norme S16-09 pour l’utilisation des boulons à couple contrôlé dans les assemblages antiglissement.

Le coefficient de frottement étant un facteur important lors de l’installation, ces boulons sont fournis avec des rondelles trempées. Par ailleurs, l’utilisation de boulons à couple contrôlé nécessite des essais préalables et une attention particulière lors de la manipulation et de l’entreposage afin d’éviter la détérioration du lubrifiant au fil du temps.

Assemblages – Généralités2017-04-19T13:20:00-05:00
QUESTION:(2015) Pour un assemblage à cornières jumelées boulonnées à l’âme avec cornière double soudée au support (Figure 2), le bord supérieur des angles peut-il aussi être soudé pour augmenter la capacité de la soudure?

RÉPONSE: Les assemblages rotulés doivent permettre la rotation à l’extrémité de la poutre simplement appuyée afin qu’elle puisse atteindre sa capacité en flexion, etc. Le soudage du bord supérieur des angles du support nuit à la rotation de l’extrémité et doit donc être évité.

QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2015) J’ai récemment rencontré des boulons A325 entièrement filetés dans les assemblages d’une charpente de bâtiment. Ces boulons sont-ils autorisés? Présentent-ils les mêmes résistances que des boulons à filetage de longueur normale? Comment sont-ils identifiés après l’installation? Offrent-ils de quelconques avantages?

RÉPONSE:

Les boulons A325 filetés sur la longueur entière sont autorisés en vertu de l’exigence supplémentaire S1 d’ASTM A325. Ils sont limités aux longueurs de boulons inférieures à quatre fois le diamètre nominal.

Résistances des boulons: Dans la mesure où la résistance à la traction repose sur la section filetée (0,75Ab), elle est indépendante de la longueur filetée. Toutefois, la résistance au cisaillement dans les assemblages par contact doit être réduite pour tenir compte de l’interception des filets par le plan de cisaillement. S’ils sont utilisés dans un joint antiglissement avec une grande longueur de serrage, la section de boulon moindre (filetée) sur la longueur de serrage entière influe sur la relation entre la force de serrage et l’allongement du boulon et peut entraîner une réduction de la force de serrage dans le cas où la méthode du tour d’écrou est utilisée. L’importance de cet effet est en cours d’étude.

Identification: La tête du boulon est marquée « A325T » et non « A325 », comme illustré à la Figure 1.

Avantages: Ils n’offrent aucun avantage en matière de résistance des boulons. Toutefois, le fabricant et le monteur peuvent estimer leur utilisation intéressante dans certaines situations pour des raisons de commande de pièces et de gestion des stocks, notamment dans les cas où des pièces en acier assemblées de faible épaisseur, et non les boulons, déterminent la résistance au cisaillement de l’assemblage

 

FIGURE 1 : Boulon A325 fileté sur toute la longueur

QUESTION: (HIVER2014/2015) Comment détermine-t-on la résistance pour une section brute de goussets – doit-on utiliser la clause 13.4.3 de la norme S16-09 sur les âmes des éléments fléchis non munis de deux ailes, ou la clause 13.11 sur la rupture en cisaillement? Les résultats sont très différents dans les deux cas.

RÉPONSE: Ni l’une ni l’autre. La clause 21.12 « Éléments assemblés sous contraintes de cisaillement et de traction combinées », qui a été récemment ajoutée à la norme CSA S16-14, couvre cet aspect.

QUESTION: (ÉTÉ2014) Les assemblages rigides boulonnés utilisés dans une marquise doivent-ils être anti-glissement? Ma question fait référence à une situation où les assemblages anti-glissement ne sont pas indispensables pour le contrôle de la flèche. Je possède de nombreuses années d’expérience dans le calcul des assemblages, mais j’ai rarement eu à travailler sur des assemblages anti-glissement pour des portiques contreventés ou des cadres rigides résistant aux charges dues au vent.s.

RÉPONSE: La question fondamentale qui se pose ici est de savoir si la fatigue doit être prise en considération et si la charpente sera soumise à des charges répétitives et à des contraintes alternées. Une marquise relativement légère soumise à des charges dues à un vent soufflant par rafales peut subir des contraintes alternées et un nombre important de cycles de charges pour justifier une telle évaluation. La décision revient à l’ingénieur chargé des calculs. La conception en fatigue est traitée à la clause 26 de la norme S16.

QUESTION: (ÉTÉ 2014) Les exigences relatives aux pièces tendues goupillées stipulées à la norme CSA S16-09 me paraissent extrêmement difficiles à respecter. Si je comprends bien, elles imposent l’utilisation de barres à œil. Est-ce que je me trompe?

RÉPONSE: Les exigences stipulées à la norme CSA S16-09 visent à garantir un état limite ultime de la plastification de la section brute et sont donc assez restrictives. De nouvelles exigences ont été introduites dans la norme CSA S16-14. Cette nouvelle disposition améliore considérablement la souplesse de la conception.

QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2014) Si une seule aile d’une cornière travaillant en traction est reliée à ses supports d’extrémité au moyen de soudures d’angle longitudinales, comment puis-je déterminer si le décalage en cisaillement est important et comment est-il pris en compte?

RÉPONSE: L’effet dû au décalage en cisaillement dans une pièce en traction est habituellement évalué en utilisant une méthode de calcul selon la surface utile. Pour les éléments assemblés par soudage, l’article 12.3.3.3 de CSA S16-09 s’applique à des éléments de sections diverses en général. L’aire de la section transversale de la cornière est divisée en deux composantes, à savoir l’aile fixée et l’aile saillante. La Figure 1(a) montre une cornière assemblée par une paire de soudures longitudinales de longueur L. Pour l’aile reliée, le décalage en cisaillement est un facteur si L ≤ 2w2. En vertu de l’article 12.3.3.3 (b) (ii) et (iii), sa surface utile nette An2, représentée à la Figure 1(b), est fonction de la configuration des soudures et, pour les soudures courtes, également de l’épaisseur de l’aile. La surface utile nette de l’aile saillante An3 se calcule conformément à l’article 12.3.3.3(c). Son décalage en cisaillement est une fonction du rapport de l’excentricité de la soudure par rapport au centre de gravité de l’aile saillante x sur la longueur de la soudure L. Ensuite, la résistance à la traction de l’élément est calculée conformément à l’article 13.2(a)(iii) en utilisant la surface utile totale de la section de cornière Ane = An2 + An3.

Vous trouverez de plus amples renseignements dans le Commentaire ICCA sur la norme CSA S16-09 dans la Partie 2 du << Handbook of Steel Construction >>.

QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2013) La Clause 13.11 de S16-09 semble avoir omis la vérification de la rupture de la section nette en cisaillement. Qu’en est-il du mode de rupture en cisaillement et où est la disposition relative à la rupture en cisaillement pur?

RÉPONSE: L’équation fournie dans la Clause 13.11 de S16-09, indiquée ci-dessous, comprend à la fois les contributions en traction et en cisaillement à la résistance au cisaillement-traction d’un assemblage boulonné.

Le premier terme rend compte de la résistance à la traction alors que le deuxième terme représente la composante de cisaillement. Un exemple est illustré à la Figure 2a. La résistance maximale au cisaillement-traction est obtenue lorsque la ou les sections nettes soumises à la traction atteignent leur limite de rupture. Généralement, la déformation associée à cette limite de traction est trop faible pour mobiliser en même temps une rupture complète en cisaillement. Comme le recommandent Driver et al., la composante en cisaillement est fixée à 0,6 fois la valeur moyenne de Fy et Fu dans ce calcul. Il convient de noter que la surface brute en cisaillement Agv (définie comme étant la surface du ou des plans tangentiels aux trous de boulons) est utilisée dans ce calcul.La rupture en cisaillement pur, illustrée pour cet exemple à la Figure 2b, doit également être envisagée. Cela est couvert par le deuxième terme de l’équation ci-dessus. En l’absence de l’incompatibilité de déformation mentionnée plus haut, une résistance au cisaillement plus élevée peut être atteinte pour la rupture en cisaillement pur. Toutefois, la Clause 13.11 offre une solution simple.

Figure 2a: Cisaillement-traction                                             Figure 2b: Rupture en cisaillement
QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2013) Comment le coefficient de réduction de résistance des soudures d’angle multiples, Mw , s’applique-t-il ? Veuillez fournir un exemple.

RÉPONSE:Dans la configuration de soudure illustrée à la Figure 1, des soudures d’angle de 8 millimètres sont utilisées, Xu = 490 MPa et la tôle est en acier G40.21 350W. Noter que la tôle arrière est plus épaisse.
En vertu de CSA S16-09 Clause 13.13.2.2:

Vr = 0.67 ɸAX(1.00 + 0.50 sin1.5 θ) Mw

où:

θ = angle de l’axe de la soudure par rapport à la ligne d’action de la force appliquée
Mw = coefficient de réduction de résistance des soudures d’angle multiples

a) Soudure à θ = 60°:

Orientation de la soudure considérée : θ1 = 60°
Orientation de la soudure dans l’assemblage le plus près de 90o : θ2 = θ1 = 60°

 
b) Soudures longitudinales (θ = 0°):
Orientation de la soudure considérée : θ1 = 0°
Orientation de la soudure dans l’assemblage le plus près de 90°: θ2 = 60°
 
c) Résistance de l’ensemble soudé: Vr = 2 x 0.67 x 0.67 x 8 x 100 x 0.707 x 0.490 (1.00 + 0.50 sin1.5 0o) 0.895
+ 0.67 x 0.67 x 8 x 120 x 0.707 x 0.490 (1.00 + 0.50 sin1.5 60o) 1.00
= 2 x 111 + 209 = 431 kNPour les électrodes correspondantes, il n’est pas nécessaire de vérifier la résistance du métal de base.

 
QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2012) Lors du calcul des assemblages boulonnés, les charges sismiques sontelles considérées comme étant statiques ou cycliques?

RÉPONSE: L’article de la Zone sismique intitulé « A ssemblages boulonnés pour applications sismiques » dans le numéro 31 de la revue Avantage Acier (été 2008) décrivait les exigences relatives aux assemblages boulonnés pour les applications sismiques conformément à la norme S16-01. Vous pouvez consulter cet article en cliquant sur le lien ci-dessous : https://cisc-icca.ca/ciscwp/product/advantage-steel-no-31/

Dans le CNB 2010 et la norme S16-09, la restriction en matière de hauteur des édifices pour les constructions conventionnelles où l’accélération spectrale de courte période spécifiée dépasse IEFaSa(0.2), a été relevée. Les exigences s’appliquant aux assemblages boulonnés s’appliquent également à ces structures plus élevées bâties selon des méthodes de construction classique.

QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2012) Lors du calcul des cordons de soudure en cisaillement, doit-on vérifier la résistance du métal de base au niveau de la face fusionnée?

RÉPONSE: Selon la norme S16-01, la résistance au cisaillement des cordons de soudure est calculée comme étant la moins élevée de : (a) la résistance du métal au niveau de la soudure donnée en fonction de la résistance finale de l’électrode, Xu, et du plan de gorge, Aw et (b) la résistance du métal de base donnée en fonction de sa résistance à la traction, Fu, et de la face fusionnée, Am. À moins d’utiliser des électrodes non appariées, la résistance au métal de base ne régit pas le calcul des joints soumis à une charge longitudinale. Cependant, lorsque l’orientation du cordon de soudure se rapproche de l’élément soumis à la charge transversale, c’est la résistance du metal de base qui régit le calcul en raison de la résistance nettement supérieure du métal de la soudure.

Dans la norme S16-09, il n’est plus nécessaire de vérifier la résistance du métal de base au niveau de la face fusionnée lorsqu’on utilise des électrodes appariées (Clause 13.13.2.2). Des études réalisées à l’Université d’Alberta ont démontré que la résistance du métal de base déterminée à partir de la résistance vierge du métal de base ne représente pas la résistance au cisaillement. Les chercheurs ont souligné que les propriétés du métal de base au niveau de la face fusionnée sont influencées par l’imbrication de la soudure et des métaux de base. À moins d’utiliser des électrodes non appariées, la résistance du métal de base au niveau de la face fusionnée n’a pas besoin d’être vérifiée, quelle que soit l’orientation du cordon de soudure.Pour une liste des électrodes appariées pour les aciers CSA G40.21, voir le tableau 4 dans la norme S16-09.
QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2012) Si des pannes à semelle large sont également soumises à une traction axiale importante transmise par l’assemblage de la semelle inférieure aux supports au moyen de deux files transversales de boulons de haute résistance, comment doisje tenir compte du cisaillement différentiel ? En particulier, pour l’aire nette efficace Ane, doit-on prendre la valeur 0,75An, conformément à la Clause 12.3.3.2 (c) (ii) de S16-09?

RÉPONSE: Cela n’est pas une approche prudente. Dans cette situation, l’effet du cisaillement différentiel est plus sévère que dans le cas de cornières assemblées par une aile au moyen de deux lignes transversales d’organes d’assemblage. Par conséquent, Ane < 0,60An. D’un autre côté, la limite inférieure de Ane peut être fixée à Anf, où Anf est l’aire nette de la bride assemblée seule. Ainsi, Ane doit être choisie quelque part entre Anf et 0,60An.

QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2011) Est-il approprié d’utiliser un assemblage à cornières doubles pour reprendre une traction axiale ou une combinaison de cisaillement et de traction axiale?

RÉPONSE: L’assemblage à cornières doubles est un type d’assemblage en cisaillement très courant. Il comporte une paire de cornières qui sont généralement soudées au poteau en atelier et boulonnées à l’âme des poutres au chantier (Figure 1). Bien que l’assemblage à cornières doubles soit un type d’assemblage en cisaillement très prisé, son utilisation est déconseillée lorsque la transmission d’un effort de traction axiale important est requise, par exemple pour les assemblages d’extrémité des poutres de cadres contreventés et les poutres collectrices soumises à des forces de traction axiale considérables. Les études citées dans la référence ci-dessous ont démontré que les assemblages à cornières doubles présentent une résistance à la traction axiale limitée. Dans la référence ci-dessous, les résultats des essais de plusieurs assemblages de poutres en cisaillement soumis conjointement à des forces axiales et à des forces en cisaillement sont également présentés.

Référence : Guravich, S. J. and Dawe, J. L. 2006. Simple beam connections in combined shear and tension. Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering. 33(4): 357-372.

Figure 1: Assemblage à cornières doubles
Ponts2017-04-18T16:34:04-05:00
QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2010) La norme CSA-S6, Code canadien sur le calcul des ponts routiers, stipule que les plaques d’assemblage de traverses doivent être fixées aux semelles des poutres de pont. Le détail boulonné, tel qu’illustré à la Figure 1, semble aujourd’hui assez populaire dans les travaux de restauration. Il paraît que ce détail boulonné peut être considéré « catégorie de détail B » pour la fatigue, mais je ne vois pas très bien comment le boulonnage du raidisseur à la semelle inférieure améliore l’assemblage, puisque la soudure d’âme est toujours présente.

RÉPONSE: Lorsque le raidisseur remplit également la fonction de plaque d’assemblage de traverse, il faut tenir compte de la fatigue induite par déformation et de la fatigue due à la charge. Le détail boulonné illustré ici ne modifie pas le détail de fatigue soudé raidisseur-âme pour ce qui concerne la fatigue due à la charge car ce détail soudé reste un détail de « catégorie C1 ». Cependant, le raccordement de la plaque d’assemblage aux semelles (s’il est effectué correctement) devrait améliorer consid- érablement la résistance à la fatigue induite par déformation. Afin d’éviter les soudures à la semelle en traction, de nombreuses poutres soudées sur les ponts en acier plus anciens comportent des plaques d’assemblage des traverses qui ont été coupées juste avant la semelle en traction ou meulées de manière à prendre appui sur celle-ci. À cause de cette pratique aujourd’hui démodée, l’âme a subi des contraintes hors plan dues au déplacement relatif des poutres. L’amplitude de ces contraintes, qui n’est généralement pas prise en compte dans les analyses, est considérée comme la cause principale des dommages provoqués par la fatigue induite par déformation des poutres de pont soudées. Les récentes éditions de la norme CSA-S6 stipulent que les traverses et les diaphragmes doivent être assemblés à chaque semelle pour résister à une force minimum de 90 kN.

Structures industrielles et tôlerie2017-04-18T16:29:51-05:00
QUESTION: (AUTOMNE2015) Je suis impliqué dans le calcul d’une structure industrielle non fermée pour laquelle ni le code du bâtiment ni le code de calcul des ponts ne s’appliquent. Dois-je prescrire un acier résistant à l’entaille? Existe-t-il des profilés en W résistants à l’entaille? Comment puis-je déterminer le niveau de résistance à l’entaille qui convient?

RÉPONSE: La rupture fragile est un sujet complexe. Pour maintenir la probabilité qu’elle se produise à un niveau acceptable, il convient de tenir compte des conséquences d’une défaillance, ainsi que des nombreux facteurs prépondérants décrits à l’annexe L de CSA S16-14. La résistance à l’entaille de l’acier n’est que l’un de ces facteurs. Souvent, la prévention des fractures pour des structures autres que des bâtiments et des ponts consiste à identifier les options les plus sûres puis à choisir la solution la plus faisable. Par conséquent, le ou les ingénieurs chargés du calcul, des spécifications et de la supervision de la construction, de l’AQ, du CQ, des recommandations relatives aux futures inspections, etc. sont les mieux placés pour prendre cette décision. Concernant les nuances d’acier et leur disponibilité, la situation actuelle est la suivante. Bien que les aciers de charpente courants, tels que les aciers CSA G40.21 de types W et A présentent généralement une résistance à l’entaille supérieure à celle de nombreux produits en acier utilisés pour des applications non structurelles, ils ne sont pas produits pour répondre à des exigences d’essai Charpy particulières. Les aciers de types WT et AT le sont. Les acheteurs d’aciers de types WT et AT devront également préciser la catégorie de résistance à l’entaille qui établit la température et le niveau d’énergie de l’essai de résilience Charpy V. De même, les acheteurs de nuances d’acier ASTM, telles que A992, devront préciser la température et le niveau d’énergie appropriés pour l’essai le cas échéant. À notre connaissance, les aciéries nordaméricaines produisent des profilés en W pouvant aller jusqu’à environ 440 kg/m conformes à des exigences de résistance à l’entaille comparables à CSA 350WT Cat. 3. On notera que la conformité aux exigences de l’essai de résilience Charpy V tend à accroire les coûts et les délais de livraison. Par conséquent, ces aciers ne devront pas être prescrits au hasard.

Bâtiments – Généralités2017-04-18T15:43:23-05:00
QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2012) Si de la bande d’acier CSA G40.21 300W est spécifiée en tant que matériau pour les entretoises légères dans une charpente de bâtiment, peut-on utiliser à la place des produits en acier de nuance commerciale ? Qu’en est-il s’ils sont fournis avec un rapport d’essai montrant des valeurs de limite élastique égales ou supérieures à 300 MPa?

RÉPONSE: Non. Les raisons sont notamment les suivantes :a) Les tôles et bandes d’acier de nuance commerciale ne sont pas produites pour présenter des propriétés mécaniques obligatoires telles que limite élastique minimale, contrainte de rupture et allongement.b) Les valeurs de résistance figurant dans les certificats d’essai des aciéries ne doivent pas être utilisées pour les calculs de structure. Voir la Clause 5.1.2 de la norme CSA S16-09.

QUESTION: (PRINTEMPS2011) Conformément au Code national du bâtiment, les systèmes de bâtiment en acier devront être fabriqués par des entreprises possédant la certification CSA A660 « Certification des fabricants de systèmes de bâtiment en acier ». Cette exigence s’applique-t-elle à tous les fabricants d’acier?

RÉPONSE: Non, la norme CSA A660 ne s’applique pas à tous les fabricants d’acier. Un système de bâtiment d’acier comporte de l’acier pour les éléments de charpente ainsi que des accessoires conçus et fabriqués pour produire un système de bâtiment total, qu’on appelle souvent « bâtiment métallique préfabriqué » et pour lequel le fabricant est responsable aussi bien de la conception structurale que de la fabrication du système de bâtiment. Puisque le concepteur du système de bâtiment en acier est également le vendeur, il n’y a pas de tierce partie indépendante représentant les intérêts du public. La norme CSA A660 vise à s’assurer que le fabricant de systèmes de bâtiment en acier se conforme au code du bâtiment et aux normes de conception applicables, et que le public est protégé. La grande majorité des fabricants d’acier de charpente canadiens fabriquent des structures de bâtiments qui sont conçues par des ingénieurs employés par d’autres. Ces fabricants ne sont pas tenus d’obtenir la certification CSA A660. En revanche, ils sont certifiés CSA W47.1 « Certification des compagnies de soudage par fusion de l’acier ». Certains possèdent aussi la Certification qualité de l’ICCA pour la fabrication de l’acier.Pour plus d’information, visitez : http://www.cisc-icca.ca/certification

 

CISC provides the FAQ section as a part of its commitment to the education of those interested in the use of steel in construction. Neither CISC nor the authors assume responsibility for errors or oversights resulting from the use of the information contained herein. Suggested solutions may not necessarily apply to a particular structure or application, and are not intended to replace the expertise of a professional engineer, architect or other licensed professional.